An art collage from November 2012

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  • NOVICA Signed Madhubani Folk Art Painting of Ganesha
    novica.com
    Also known as Ganesha and Vinayaka Ganapati lifts a hand in blessing. Sheela Devi depicts the Hindu lord in the lalitasana or sitting position. Flowers create a reverent atmosphere in this colorful painting. The Indian artist works in the traditional Madhubani style drawing freehand on handmade paper. As each painting is an individual creation each is unique. Colors and motifs may vary slightly from that pictured.
  • NOVICA Tribal Dance Signed Patachitra Painting with Natural Dyes
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    Bright colors prepared from natural herbs and seeds capture the effusive mood that reigns over Santhal people. They make up one of the largest tribes spread across the states of West Bengal Bihar Orissa Assam and Jharkhand. Manoranjan Chitrakar depicts women and men dancing - even their pets! After a long day's hard work Santhal peoples love to relax by dancing to light music. The Indian artist paints on paper which he pastes on cotton fabric recycled from saris thus keeping a millinery artistic tradition alive. The word pata is derived from the Sanskrit and Pali word meaning cloth and chitra means picture. Patachitra means picture painted on cloth and it refers to a storytelling tradition originating in the Medinipur region of West Bengal. The painter community is called Patua and all of the artists bear the same last name Chitrakar meaning painter. Through this unique art form the bard presents the story with pictures while simultaneously narrating a song called Pater Gaan. Patuas use colors extracted from various trees leaves fruits flowers seeds and clay. Traditionally their themes revolved around mythological stories but the newer generations of Patuas paint about contemporary social issues ranging from violence against women to climate change. They are deftly capturing the changing times. Patachitra artists once had a unique style of presenting their craft: they would go to different villages singing and telling the stories within the paintings with song and ethos to these themes. Interestingly despite the fact they all belonged to the Muslim community and practiced Islam faith they all painted about Hindu gods and goddesses and sang songs in their praise. They did not see their religious beliefs as a barrier to their craft.
  • NOVICA Original Signed Painting Bengal Tiger Black and White India
    novica.com
    Painted in black and white with natural dye on ivory tree paper this painting depicts a majestic Bengal tiger known as the pride of India. Montu Chitrakar paints this piece belonging to a specialized class of artists that paint in the patachitra style which uses a blend of oral storytelling and visual imagery. The artist's tiger paintings have been used by the WWF for their Save The Tiger project. The word pata is derived from the Sanskrit and Pali word meaning cloth and chitra means picture. Patachitra means picture painted on cloth and it refers to a storytelling tradition originating in the Medinipur region of West Bengal. The painter community is called Patua and all of the artists bear the same last name Chitrakar meaning painter. Through this unique art form the bard presents the story with pictures while simultaneously narrating a song called Pater Gaan. Patuas use colors extracted from various trees leaves fruits flowers seeds and clay. Traditionally their themes revolved around mythological stories but the newer generations of Patuas paint about contemporary social issues ranging from violence against women to climate change. They are deftly capturing the changing times. Patachitra artists once had a unique style of presenting their craft: they would go to different villages singing and telling the stories within the paintings with song and ethos to these themes. Interestingly despite the fact they all belonged to the Muslim community and practiced Islam faith they all painted about Hindu gods and goddesses and sang songs in their praise. They did not see their religious beliefs as a barrier to their craft.
  • NOVICA Original Signed Patachitra Painting Bengal Tiger from India
    novica.com
    This impressive painting depicts a wild Bengal tiger known as the pride of India. Montu Chitrakar belonging to a specialized class of artists paints this piece with natural dye on ivory tree paper in the traditional patachitra style which blends oral storytelling with visual imagery. The artist's tiger paintings have been used by the WWF for their Save The Tiger project. The word pata is derived from the Sanskrit and Pali word meaning cloth and chitra means picture. Patachitra means picture painted on cloth and it refers to a storytelling tradition originating in the Medinipur region of West Bengal. The painter community is called Patua and all of the artists bear the same last name Chitrakar meaning painter. Through this unique art form the bard presents the story with pictures while simultaneously narrating a song called Pater Gaan. Patuas use colors extracted from various trees leaves fruits flowers seeds and clay. Traditionally their themes revolved around mythological stories but the newer generations of Patuas paint about contemporary social issues ranging from violence against women to climate change. They are deftly capturing the changing times. Patachitra artists once had a unique style of presenting their craft: they would go to different villages singing and telling the stories within the paintings with song and ethos to these themes. Interestingly despite the fact they all belonged to the Muslim community and practiced Islam faith they all painted about Hindu gods and goddesses and sang songs in their praise. They did not see their religious beliefs as a barrier to their craft.
  • NOVICA Original Signed Patachitra Painting of Cows from India
    novica.com
    A herd of cows can be seen in this patachitra painting which uses a blend of oral storytelling and visual imagery to convey histories and cultural beliefs. Cows are sacred for Hindus in India depicted here by Montu Chitrakar who belongs to a specialized class of artists. The word pata is derived from the Sanskrit and Pali word meaning cloth and chitra means picture. Patachitra means picture painted on cloth and it refers to a storytelling tradition originating in the Medinipur region of West Bengal. The painter community is called Patua and all of the artists bear the same last name Chitrakar meaning painter. Through this unique art form the bard presents the story with pictures while simultaneously narrating a song called Pater Gaan. Patuas use colors extracted from various trees leaves fruits flowers seeds and clay. Traditionally their themes revolved around mythological stories but the newer generations of Patuas paint about contemporary social issues ranging from violence against women to climate change. They are deftly capturing the changing times. Patachitra artists once had a unique style of presenting their craft: they would go to different villages singing and telling the stories within the paintings with song and ethos to these themes. Interestingly despite the fact they all belonged to the Muslim community and practiced Islam faith they all painted about Hindu gods and goddesses and sang songs in their praise. They did not see their religious beliefs as a barrier to their craft.
  • NOVICA Signed Folk Art Patachitra Painting of Indian Babu
    novica.com
    Patachitra artist Manoranjan Chitrakar takes us to the past to meet a babu at the local market. Shielded from the sun by a black umbrella and wearing an eastern dress jacket he has come to buy fish - always a favorite in Bengal. Babu refers to Anglicanized Bengalis thus giving rise to the culture of babudom. True to the patachitra tradition Chitrakar paints with the natural dyes that he prepared for this painting on paper which he then pastes on cotton fabric recycled from saris. The word pata is derived from the Sanskrit and Pali word meaning cloth and chitra means picture. Patachitra means picture painted on cloth and it refers to a storytelling tradition originating in the Medinipur region of West Bengal. The painter community is called Patua and all of the artists bear the same last name Chitrakar meaning painter. Through this unique art form the bard presents the story with pictures while simultaneously narrating a song called Pater Gaan. Patuas use colors extracted from various trees leaves fruits flowers seeds and clay. Traditionally their themes revolved around mythological stories but the newer generations of Patuas paint about contemporary social issues ranging from violence against women to climate change. They are deftly capturing the changing times. Patachitra artists once had a unique style of presenting their craft: they would go to different villages singing and telling the stories within the paintings with song and ethos to these themes. Interestingly despite the fact they all belonged to the Muslim community and practiced Islam faith they all painted about Hindu gods and goddesses and sang songs in their praise. They did not see their religious beliefs as a barrier to their craft.
  • NOVICA Original Signed Patachitra Painting of Peacocks from India
    novica.com
    Inspired by the beauty of nature this painting depicts a flock of peacocks in various colors. India's Swarna Chitrakar paints this piece in the patachitra style which is a form of storytelling that blends oral traditions with visual imagery. The word pata is derived from the Sanskrit and Pali word meaning cloth and chitra means picture. Patachitra means picture painted on cloth and it refers to a storytelling tradition originating in the Medinipur region of West Bengal. The painter community is called Patua and all of the artists bear the same last name Chitrakar meaning painter. Through this unique art form the bard presents the story with pictures while simultaneously narrating a song called Pater Gaan. Patuas use colors extracted from various trees leaves fruits flowers seeds and clay. Traditionally their themes revolved around mythological stories but the newer generations of Patuas paint about contemporary social issues ranging from violence against women to climate change. They are deftly capturing the changing times. Patachitra artists once had a unique style of presenting their craft: they would go to different villages singing and telling the stories within the paintings with song and ethos to these themes. Interestingly despite the fact they all belonged to the Muslim community and practiced Islam faith they all painted about Hindu gods and goddesses and sang songs in their praise. They did not see their religious beliefs as a barrier to their craft.
  • NOVICA Signed India Kalamkari Painting in Burgundy and Blue
    novica.com
    Birds sing in a blossoming tree that spreads the fragrance of love and life. This painting alludes to the Tree of Life. Working in the traditional kalamkari style Dr. Sneh Gangal adds the fine details with a pen of sharpened bamboo. These paintings flourished during the Mughal Empire with the patronage of the Golconda sultanate.
  • Art.com
    target.com
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    Find Decorative Wall Art at Target.com! Add character and a sense of calm to any room with this beautiful Precious Orchid Art Print by Albert Koetsier. This floral close-up was made by \"-rayography\" -- by taking a black and white -ray photo of a flower and then painting it. This lightly colored purple and yellow floral print is sized 13x13\" and can be framed or hung as you choose. Great for a living room, family room, office or waiting area. Size: 13x13 Art Print. Gender: Unisex.
  • NOVICA Authentic India Madhubani Folk Art Painting
    novica.com
    Two beautiful ladies from the village of Mithila carry water in the earthen pots on their head in this beautiful painting by Devender Kumar Jha. The women are clad in colorful traditional attire and jewels. Signed by the artist this Madhubani composition is painted with acrylic and vegetable dyes on handmade paper. As each painting is an individual creation each is unique. Colors and motifs may vary slightly from that pictured.
  • NOVICA Indian Krishna and Radha Madhubani Folk Art Painting
    novica.com
    The celestial couple of Hinduism wear traditional dress as they share a musical moment together. Working in the traditional Madhubani style Devendra Kumar Jha portrays Lord Krishna and his beloved Radha in vivid colors. As each painting is an individual creation each is unique. Colors and motifs may vary slightly from that pictured.
  • NOVICA Original Signed Patachitra Painting of Ganesha from India
    novica.com
    Patachitra is a traditional storytelling method of India's West Bengal involving oral histories combined with paintings. Swarna Chitrakar comes from a specialized class of artist painting the images used in Patachitra storytelling. Painted with natural dye on ivory tree paper this piece depicts the Hindu god Ganesh alongside his consort Kalabou who takes the form of a banyan tree. Ganesha is a figure of great mysticism in Hindu traditions and his marital status a topic of great discussion and debate as reflected here in this piece. The word pata is derived from the Sanskrit and Pali word meaning cloth and chitra means picture. Patachitra means picture painted on cloth and it refers to a storytelling tradition originating in the Medinipur region of West Bengal. The painter community is called Patua and all of the artists bear the same last name Chitrakar meaning painter. Through this unique art form the bard presents the story with pictures while simultaneously narrating a song called Pater Gaan. Patuas use colors extracted from various trees leaves fruits flowers seeds and clay. Traditionally their themes revolved around mythological stories but the newer generations of Patuas paint about contemporary social issues ranging from violence against women to climate change. They are deftly capturing the changing times. Patachitra artists once had a unique style of presenting their craft: they would go to different villages singing and telling the stories within the paintings with song and ethos to these themes. Interestingly despite the fact they all belonged to the Muslim community and practiced Islam faith they all painted about Hindu gods and goddesses and sang songs in their praise. They did not see their religious beliefs as a barrier to their craft.

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