A Crash Course in Mary-Sues

gUYS THIS IS THE STUPIDEST COLLECTION EVER AND I REGRET EVER MAKING IT MARY-SUES AREN'T EVEN A THING THEY'RE JUST A STUPID CONCEPT MADE UP BY MISOGYNISTS TO SHAME GIRLS FOR CREATING STRONG FEMALE CHARACTERS THAT RESONATE WITH THEM
 
AND THEN IT GOT PICKED UP BY FANDOM ELITISTS WHO MISS THE WHOLE POINT OF FANDOM WHICH IS A LACK OF ELITISM I S2G
 
DON'T WORRY ABOUT MAKING MARY-SUES DON'T EVEN BOTHER LIKE TRY TO MAKE FULLY FLESHED OUT, REALISTIC CHARACTERS BUT LEAVE THIS STUPID MARY SUE CONCEPT OUT OF THE EQUATION BECAUSE IT'S DUMB AND I WISH I'D KNOWN THAT
 
HERE READ THIS INSTEAD IT'S MUCH BETTER
http://adventuresofcomicbookgirl.tumblr.com/post/13913540194/mary-sue-what-are-you-or-why-the-concept-of-sue-is
 
IF I DIDN'T WORK SO HARD ON THIS STUPID THING ID PROBABLY JUST DELETE AND I MIGHT STILL DO SO TBH
ALSO POTTERSUES IS A REALLY MALICIOUS POINTLESS BLOG THING LIKE MOST OF THE STORIES THEY FEATURE ARE WRITTEN BY THIRTEEN YEAR OLD GIRLS WHO ARE ALREADY STRUGGLING ENOUGH WITH MISOGYNY AND ADOLESCENCE WITHOUT PEOPLE DESTROYING THEIR OUTLET SO
 
I'M GOING TO HAVE TO ANSWER TO GOD WHEN I DIE FOR MAKING THIS COLLECTION
  • Neo Imaginations DISCLAIMER The Indian Way.
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    "Disclaimer THIS IS THE DUMBEST COLLECTION I HAVE EVER MADE MARY-SUES ARE A STUPID SEXIST CONCEPT AND I SHOULD JUST DELETE THIS COLLECTION" — @batqurl
  • hp100: Mary Sue Fails Her DADA O.W.L.s
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    "Hi, I'm Rue, and this will be a crash-course in Mary-Sues. I'm going to treat Mary-Sueism like the disease that it is. First, I will explain what it is, and what causes it. Then we will discuss symptoms. Finally, we will talk about how to diagnose and treat it." — @batqurl
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    "A Mary-Sue is basically an unrealistic character. But don't be fooled by the typical description of one-girls named Serenity Moonbeam who ride unicorns and vomit rainbows. The actual Mary-Sue is much harder to pin down than that." — @batqurl
  • I loved you forever;
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    "You can have a bitchy, narcissistic character who is a Mary-Sue, and likewise, you can have a nice, popular character who isn't a Sue at all. It all depends on how the character is presented, vs. how the character acts, vs. how the universe treats the character, which are all really different things." — @batqurl
  • pretty background
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    "As an example, we will use Bella Swan. I know she's the first character that someone will bring up when you're talking about Mary-Sues, but, well, she is just a really good, textbook example of one. Let's see how these three facets of Bella compare to one another:" — @batqurl
  • glamour-glitter
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    "PRESENTATION: Stephanie Meyer presents Bella as an every girl, the kind of person you might know or relate to. She's said to be more plain than pretty, with awkward social skills. She's also supposed to be clumsy, but very unselfish, and naturally intelligent. This is what the author wants you to think of Bella." — @batqurl
  • unicorns never die
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    "ACTION: Bella doesn't really act like this, when you separate the showing from the telling. She says she's awkward and "more plain than pretty" but as soon as she moves to Forks, everyone wants to be her friend and all the boys want her phone number. She also has a tendency to judge people based on superficial qualities-she identifies Eric, a boy who's been nothing but nice to her, by his "bad skin and greasy hair." She once points out a girl with "braces and a bad perm" for no real reason. And overall, doesn't really seem to see anyone at the school as being important at all, except for the Cullens. These are not the marks of an "every girl." An every girl won't care about bad skin and greasy hair and bad perms because she's been there too. Not that an every girl only thinks nice things about people, but they aren't nearly as superficial as Bella. Bella's reasons for thinking bitch things about other people are as follows: One, they're unattractive, and two, they aren't obsessed with her. That's basically it." — @batqurl
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    "She's told she's unselfish by numerous characters, but all she seems to do is look out for herself-in New Moon, she isolates herself from her friends and family and does reckless stunts without regard for anyone else. She manipulates Jacob's feelings for her on multiple occasions. At the end of the series, she's perfectly prepared to give up all her human friends and family without any explanation to join the Cullens." — @batqurl
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    "As for clumsiness, she doesn't fall that often. Usually her lack of coordination is used as an excuse for male characters to carry her around places. And while she's supposed to be well-read, we never actually see her reading anything that can't be found on a high-school reading list." — @batqurl
  • to whom it may concern,
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    "INTERACTION: This could all be brushed off as Bella painting herself as better than she is, since it's first person. This is where interaction comes into play-how the character interacts with the universe, or rather how the universe interacts with /her/." — @batqurl
  • MICKEY AND MINNIE
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    "As we just covered, Bella is kind of a terrible person, but nobody ever really calls her out on this, and we never see her suffer any consequences. Everything bad that happens to her is someone else's fault. She uses Jacob multiple times, but he still thinks she's wonderful. She treats her friends like shit for most of their Senior year, but when she decides to be social again, she is almost immediately accepted back into their circle. Anyone who /doesn't/ accept her is portrayed as a bad friend or a bitch." — @batqurl
  • I feel the chaos around me.
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    "She's dull and uninterested in anyone when she starts school, but still everyone wants to be friends with her. This is the definition of a Sue: the discrepancy between what we're supposed to think of the character, and what the character is actually like. These three aspects have to line up." — @batqurl
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    "You don't get to have the nice, normal girl, and the bitch, AND the center of the universe all in one. You pick one. If she's going to be bitchy, then people probably won't like her that much. If she's the every girl, then she doesn't get to have everyone lining up to be in her good book. And if she's special, then dammit, there needs to be something to justify that specialness." — @batqurl
  • :D A disney icon
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    "PART TWO: So there's your basic definition. Here are some symptoms. Let me make it clear right now, that these traits are NOT automatic indicators of a Mary-Sue. It's all about context. You'll see what I mean in a bit." — @batqurl
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    "PERSONALITY TRAITS: Actually, a lot of Mary-Sues don't really have one. They're more of a vessel; the author wants someone to have cool stuff happen to, not an actual character with thoughts and emotions." — @batqurl
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    "If there /is/ a personality, it's usually what the author wants to be-never what they actually are. Self-insertion and escapism exist in small amount almost every character, as well they should; it adds realism and fun. Mary-Sues, however, take this to the extreme." — @batqurl
  • Rainbow sugar swirls
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    "They will be either brave and cheerful (despite some terrible past) or they will be unnecessarily mopey and depressed. For this, think of Newton's law: Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. Bad things will happen to characters, and they will react in some way. Their reaction should be equal to how bad that thing was. If a character gets raped, then they should not brush it off and be happy. It's a heavily traumatic thing and should be treated as such. If a character gets dumped by her boyfriend, though, then they should not go into a suicidal depression." — @batqurl
  • (via blonde-for-hire)
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    "BUT THERE IS AN EXCEPTION. You can justify just about anything in a character-it just has to make sense. For example, a character can get dumped by her boyfriend and then become suicidal, but this can't be treated as a perfectly rational response, because it isn't. It means that either the relationship was heavily co-dependent, or that the character has serious mental health issues, or both. Either way, these issues should be addressed; don't pretend like killing yourself after your boyfriend dumps you is the normal and acceptable thing to do. It isn't." — @batqurl
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    "The Sue will be incorruptible. They will never, ever be tempted to do the wrong thing; they will immediately know what are the right and wrong things to do and they will always choose right." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "Her "major flaws" will be stubbornness and a bad temper. These will only ever help her, never hurt her — because she's always right, so whatever cause she dedicates herself to with such stubbornness will be a good cause, and whoever she loses her temper with will deserve it." — @batqurl
  • With a bottle of red wine
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    "Occasionally a complete asshole, especially when she's supposed to be all of the above. Nobody will call her out on her abrasive, casually abusive behavior. Plus, strong badass characters who would normally rip someone's spleen out for looking at them cross-eyed are instantly cowed and become meek, spineless Wangst factories as soon as she "puts them in their place."" — @batqurl
  • dianna agron my <3
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    "Highly persuasive, regardless of the actual content of their conversations. Everyone finds her opinions are just better than their own - even when they're usually stubborn bastards." — @batqurl
  • World of magic.
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    "APPEARANCE: They will be so beautiful, it's a curse. While it's true that beauty can sometimes be a disadvantage, it's most of the time an advantage. Don't pretend it isn't. Alternately, the Sue will be very un-attractive-either way, their physical appearance will make them stand out in a crowd." — @batqurl
  • you belong with me | Tumblr
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    "A lot of times, the appearance will play out kind of like Taylor Swift's You Belong with Me video. They put big glasses on Taylor to make her seem awkward, but she's still Taylor Fucking Swift. Likewise, the writer will often throw in "flaws" like large glasses, or very curly hair, that actually aren't flaws at all." — @batqurl
  • Taylor ' You Belong With Me ' Music Video Clip
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    "And then at some point in the story, she will straighten her hair and wear contacts, and suddenly she will walk into prom in her princess dress and she will be the most beautiful girl in the room and everyone will know that she was Beautiful All Along." — @batqurl
  • Fanpop - wolfgirl1996's Photo
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    "They will also often have kaleidoscope eyes, rainbow hair, or some physical feature that makes them stand out. This is relative to the setting-in Anime, a lot of times blue or pink hair is nothing special. It's only a sue trait if it makes them stand out." — @batqurl
     
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    "Her appearance will often contradict itself-she'll be willowy and delicate, but have huge, perky D-Cups, when in real life the thinner you are, the smaller your breasts usually are. Another example is the small, delicate waif who can fight like a boss and take down far bulkier opponents, despite displaying no muscle mass herself because muscular women are t0tes gr0$$." — @batqurl
  • zbyszek nature sunset sea Autumn flowers man 781x522 Bookmarks #1445281 - Picture For Me
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    "She'll wear outfits that are completely impractical, but they look cool. And they never seem to get in the way. If she's supposed to be in uniform, she'll alter her uniform to be hotter than everyone else's. She will never get called out on this." — @batqurl
  • Audrey Hepburn Complex
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    "She'll have some kind of special birthmark or scar. They will always look awesome and have some cool story behind them, and will never be in a place that is unattractive." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "SKILLS: She will have inexplicable or poorly defined abilities, but it doesn't matter because she probably won't use them much anyway. Mostly she just has them to make her look awesome." — @batqurl
  • В Контакте | Фотографии
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    "She'll also always be better than you. If she doesn't know something at the beginning of the story, she'll learn it until she's better than the person she learned from...a week later. They will say she's gifted, a prodigy, unlike anything they've ever seen." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "Mary-Sues don't have normal sex. They have mind-blowingly divine sex, regardless of experience. Their genitals can end wars and cure cancer, but mostly they are used to redeem their villainous love interest." — @batqurl
  • pretty background
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    "She will speak several languages fluently. There is usually no explanation as to how or why she learned these languages, and she will probably never have to use them." — @batqurl
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    "Her abilities don't have to line up with her setting. She can have psychic abilities in a world where no other magic/supernatural things occur. "Yeah, I can read minds. NBD." If the ability IS treated as unusual, figuring out why she can do this thing usually takes a back seat to some other plotline. Usually sex, but not always." — @batqurl
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    "She will have absurd physical abilities. Dick Grayson is acrobatic because he grew up in a Circus. Barbara Gordon is athletic because she was training to be an Olympic gymnast. Bruce Wayne is badass because he spent years studying how to be so. Mary-Sue is all of those things, just because." — @batqurl
  • queenie hawkings
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    "ACCESSORIES: She has magic or symbolic jewelry. Special weapons that border on impractical. Her gun is better than yours. Her transport is cool and expensive and it has a million special features. It can drive itself, and make toast. What now, //Italy//?" — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "STORY CHARACTER RELATIONSHIPS: Mary-Sue will grab the attention of her designated love interest right away. If that love interest is already in a happy relationship, then that relationship will be split up in some way. Usually the other girl will be twisted into a terrible person to justify the love interest's switching her out for Mary-Sue." — @batqurl
  • Restart My Heart
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    "Characters the author likes won't stop talking about how amazing she is. Characters the author dislikes won't stop making themselves look bad by insulting her. Sometimes those characters will be redeemed and grow to love the Sue just like everyone else. Otherwise they will be punished in some karmic way for daring not to like Sue." — @batqurl
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    "Previously-established personalities change in reaction to her. Arrogant gimps may admire her for everything. Sweet, mild-mannered characters (that she and the author don't like) insult and degrade her. A leader with responsibilities pays attention only to her. Young, reckless characters who would never settle down just yet will become totally reliable. Evil characters follow her around like a puppy or seem uncharacteristically obsessed with her. Extremely competent characters become stumbling buffoons who require her help to do anything. The characters in general just seem unnaturally focused on her, positive or negative." — @batqurl
  • there's chemicals in the clouds
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    "If a character among them is about to turn evil, Mary-Sue will be the first one to detect it. Or she will prevent it By the Power of Love." — @batqurl
  • 0hSuzyQ's favorite dew websites - StumbleUpon
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    "She gets special treatment in-universe. The classic example is the Harry Potter "exchange student" fic where a sixteen-year-old American girl enters Hogwarts as a sixth year, is immediately given a spot on the Quidditch team and doesn't have to wear the uniform. Chances are good that Sue will be making all the calls that should be somebody else's prerogative; she's probably the one telling the Sorting Hat which house she's going to be in." — @batqurl
  • just a paranoid unicorn by hermionejane
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    "STORY ELEMENTS: The story revolves around Mary-Sue. Without her, there wouldn't be one." — @batqurl
  • Butterflies and Tornados
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    "If she has any flaws, they don't get in the way. Clumsiness isn't a flaw. It can be troublesome, but it's not a matter or morality." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "Another popular "flaw" is some kind of addiction. Substance abuse or cigarettes or nymphomania. Of course, you never see the bad sides to these-you never see a Sue pausing while running to cough up some lung. You don't see her hating herself for sleeping with everything that moves. You just see how badass she looks, smoking in front of authority figures, and how good she is in bed." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "Overall, the flaws only count if they actually cause problems for her. If you are a Starship captain, then it is highly unlikely that you will ever need to play the Banjo, so not being able to play the Banjo is not a flaw. If you are a Starship captain, and you are insecure, and it causes your crew to lack confidence in you, that is a flaw. And if that lack of confidence causes some terrible accident, that makes you lose your post and have to earn it back, or else learn to be more assertive and take control of situations so accidents /don't/ happen, then your flaw has made you grow as a character, and has been used to proper effect. (Which isn't to say that you will never feel insecure again-just that you have grown as a character and are better equipped to handle it.)" — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "The Sue is the Chosen One. If she's a fanfic character and there's already a Chosen One, then she will "share" the spotlight. She will be Harry's twin sister. Or she will be destined to "protect" Harry and guide him on his journey. Or she'll just replace Harry all-together. Or she'll be part of the same Chosen One organization. She is Sailor Earth. She is the Tye-Dye Ranger. And she's better than you." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "Sometimes, the Sue has only one supernatural power: being The Chosen One. Her chosenness makes her critically important to the world, but since she has no other godlike powers, she will spend most of the story being kidnapped (usually by a villainous love interest) and/or otherwise victimized." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "She will never be old. She's always young and hot. Possibly she will start out as an adorable child, and then grow up to be young and hot. And maybe become immortal so she can always be young and hot. Because old people are gross." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "She might perform a Heroic Sacrifice as a way to prove that she's Too Good For This Sinful Earth. Bonus points if the story goes out of the way to ensure she doesn't leave an ugly corpse (whether it be by a method that doesn't involve external physical damage or by her body not being recovered).
    More bonus points if it's not a permanent death and she comes back, especially with no explanation." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "She might be half human, half something adorable. She might feel shame for this but overall it just serves the purpose of telling us how special she is. Being half elf, vampire, veela, angel, or demon-all very popular." — @batqurl
     
    I'm Hannah. I go to an art school that I hate. My blog can be described as girly, I guess. I am...
  • The Princess Blog
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    "If she ever does anything wrong, she's both instantly remorseful about it and Easily Forgiven by those she wrongs." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "She will often suffer from Special Snowflake Syndrome, having some trait or backstory that sets her apart from her race." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "NOW FOR PART THREE: Types of Mary-Sues. Subtitled: Yes, there are more than one. And more often than not, they overlap-that is, one character, if they are a Sue at all, will usually be more than one kind." — @batqurl
  • A single moment of sincerity.
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    "BLACK HOLE SUE: Her gravity is so great, she draws all the attention and causes other characters (and, often, reality itself) to bend and contort in order to accommodate her. Characters don't act naturally around her. The writer will never bother to make any other character consistent; the other characters will say whatever sets themselves up best for her response. Black Hole Sue will dominate every scene-even if she isn't actually present in one, the other characters will all be talking about her. Nobody will challenge her; if they do, they will realize they are wrong (complete with a dramatic apology and pleads for forgiveness) or else they will just be unrealistically easy to beat. There is no real story here; it's just a pedestal put up to show off the author's favorite character. She's better than you." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "THE PURITY SUE: Probably what you first thing of when you hear the term Mary-Sue. This Sue is overly positive. Her only real flaws are endearing things like being clumsy or naive. She has many positive traits, most of them passive. She's beautiful, innocent, mild-mannered and soft-spoken. She doesn't usually do any of the heavy lifting-she inspires everyone around her to do good things just by how good she herself is. She is the Princess that gets saved from the tower, she's the girl that turns bad boys good. She's better than you." — @batqurl
  • The Princess Blog
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    "GOD MODE SUE: Contrary to popular belief, it's one d. God-Moding. It comes from the term God Mode, which in video games is a cheat that prevents characters from being harmed. The God Mode Sue is God. She exists purely to show up how pathetically weak the rest of the world is, and how badly they need his or her help. If there's anybody else that is even capable of standing up for themselves, they may lose their abilities for some reason when the character comes into the equation, or become incompetent boobs, or both. They'll probably get captured or find something that they just can't handle. Then the God Mode Sue shows up, saves the day on his or her own at least twice as easily as they usually do when working as a team, and doesn't get his or her ass kicked at all. Then he or she stands around and wallows in their praise a bit. She's better than you." — @batqurl
  • Let me whisper light lies, cover the other mask
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    "MARY TZU: This is a Sue most common in warfare stories, and the only Sue that is more often male than female. She is a character with unrealistic abilities as a strategist. She can pull a win out of any battle or match, no matter how sorry it looks-she will pull victory from thin air. She knows what the enemy is going to do, she knows what innocent third parties are going to do and she knows things that are entirely up to chance, like the weather. Either she knows all this, or she's just really, really lucky. Either way, she's better than you." — @batqurl
  • escalaphobia
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    "JERK SUE: This Sue is kind of a bitch. Nobody gets how awesome she is, and she hates that. Everyone has the nerve to fall in love with her. Everybody at school hates her, and she'll play it like she's the victim, when really it's just because she's a huge bitch. Their antics can range from petty to sociopathic, but they'll never get called out on it. The other characters will tolerate her behavior because she's better than you." — @batqurl
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 - Hermione Granger
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    "POSSESSION SUE: The writer will take an existing character and warp them beyond all recognition. In their world, Hermione was kidnapped at birth and sent to live with Muggles. In actuality, she's a pure-blood Veela Princess who is betrothed to marry Draco. The "glamor" or Polyjuice Potion will wear off, and she will suddenly become incredibly beautiful. She will ditch her friends and move into the Slytherin Dorms, and she and Draco will live happily ever after, as though he never even called her the M Word. It's a good thing this writer is around to show you all this, otherwise you might not realize how much better she is than you." — @batqurl
  • are you having a good time, sweetheart?
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    "COPY CAT SUE: This Sue is a carbon copy of an existing character...but better. She's Gotham City's latest heroine, and she has the Joker captured and reformed in the very first chapter. She has a batarang, too! It's bigger than Batman's. Cause she's better than him. And she's better than you. (Quick note, my very first Mary-Sue was a huge Copy Cat Sue. She was a carbon copy of Kairi from Kingdom Hearts, put in the Avatar: The Last Airbender fandom. Ah, memories...)" — @batqurl
  • Fuck Yeah Love!
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    "RELATIONSHIP SUE: This Sue exists mostly for romance. That is basically it. She is a stand-in for the author, so that the author can live vicariously through her and her relationships. This is kind of a common element in any Mary-Sue, but a Relationship Sue's main purpose is this. Special Snowflake Bella Swan doesn't need anything in her life but Edward. Their love can withstand anything. He loves her SO GODDAMN MUCH because she is better than all his other options. And she's better than you. (Note, the Sue can also take the form of the love interest. For example, Edward is a Marty-Stu. So is Barbie's boyfriend Ken.)" — @batqurl
  • Love is not a tragedy, a bittersweet reality.
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    "(Another Note, this Sue shows up A LOT in roleplaying. When did rping suddenly become Match.com: Fictional Edition? Cause I have no idea. Rp couples are fun but that's not the only point of it. JS.)" — @batqurl
  • blue jeans, old tees, and broken dreams
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    "SYMPATHETIC SUE: This Sue has a terrible past, and she wants to tell you all about it. She watched her brother being killed by their abusive parents, and then she was raped one day while going to school, where all of the other kids always laughed at her anyway. Then her whole race of...Vulcans...was killed off...and she was the last one left. She is understandably upset. But the thing is..her angst doesn't really make sense, is never portrayed realistically. It doesn't really have any long-term consequences, it just is there to make the other characters feel bad for her and try to cheer her up. As soon as her angst is gone, the story will either end, or just never bring it up again. This lack of angst usually occurs right after having sex with Love Interest (because in Sue-Land, being raped doesn't leave you with a messed up sexual identity, apparently.) Love Interest is drawn to her because she is so strong to have gone through everything she did. She is so very much better than you." — @batqurl
  • All things pretty
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    "ANTI-SUE: This is what happens when authors try to make characters that aren't Sues, but don't actually know what Sues are. They usually take the traits of a Purity Sue and flip them. This Sue is loud and bitchy and ugly and nobody likes her. The thing is, even if she says that, we don't actually see anyone not liking her. All we see are the people who do. Or if we do see the people who don't like her, they are treated as terrible people. They don't hate Anti Sue because she's a terrible person...they just hate her because /they/ are terrible people. And the plot still revolves around her. This makes the logic come unglued, because at least with Mary Sue Classic, you can kinda get that if someone is beautiful and sweet and innocent and shit, then yeah, she'll be well-liked. But if someone is bitchy, unattractive, and useless, and yet people still fawn over her, then there is a problem. They take away the looks and the skills and the dazzling personality, but somehow, Anti-Sue is still better than you." — @batqurl
  • vessel of misery
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    "VILLAIN SUE: This is Purity Sue's evil twin sister. She's bad to the bone. Usually because the author wants a relationship with a hot villain, or because said author hates all the protagonists...or both. Either way, expect this Sue to glamorize a life of crime in a way even Bonnie and Clyde never could. They will often have some kind of sad backstory, overlapping them a little with Sympathetic Sue, that explains why they became evil. She's more badass than any villain you've ever heard of. She's better than you." — @batqurl
  • And he's as clear as a ghost
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    "FIXER-SUE: Most of the Sues we've talked about so far can be found in any kind of story. A Fixer-Sue, however, is found almost exclusively in fanfiction. If a writer doesn't like how something in canon should go, they will bring in the Fixer Sue. Fixer Sue can be anyone that the author needs. She can be a Villain Sue to kill off Ron, thereby letting Hermione and Harry live happily ever after. She can be a private detective who finds out that Sirius Black isn't dead after all, and sends him back to his friends. You see the point. This Sue, as a plot device, isn't always better than you, but her version of canon is WAY better than yours. (Fixer-Sue can also be found in works that are written by many different people over different periods of time, such as comic books.)" — @batqurl
  • Crazy shit people do to their Barbies
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    "PARODY SUE: Exactly what is sounds like. You've probably run into one of these if you've spent any amount of time on Fanfiction.net. They can go in a lot of directions, but basically writers get tired of Mary-Sues and make fun of them in stories. That is basically it." — @batqurl
  • Crazy shit people do to their Barbies
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    "THIRTY-SUE PILEUP: Does not actually have to be thirty. This is when you see Sue upon Sue in one story. A lot of the time, this happens when the writer decides to be nice and instead of making everyone in the story look stupid so their protagonist can shine, she decides that EVERYONE can be awesome...just not as awesome as the main Sue. Alternately (I used to do this a lot), the author will not only write wish-fulfillment characters for themselves, also decide to bring their friends along with them. This culminates in an Assload of Mary-Sues, with Barbie as the lead and all her Sue friends Teresa, Midge, Stacey, Tori, Drew, and Summer as back-up. Not to mention her Relationship Sue Ken, and her Sue family Skipper, Stacie, Kelly and Krissy. And they are all better than you." — @batqurl
  • snow white | Tumblr
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    "PART FIVE: What to do about it?" — @batqurl
  • I'm so Amber Rose!
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    "First of all, if you are worried you have a Sue on your hands and are frantically trying to convince yourself you don't, then you probably do. For reference, google Mary-Sue Litmus Test. The links that come up will be tests that can help you determine whether your character is a Sue. These tests aren't always accurate, but they can help." — @batqurl
  • We take sour sips from life's lush lips.
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    "Start reading Pottersues. Just google it. Pottersues is a Livejournal blog that specializes in the discussing of Mary-Sues in Harry Potter fanfiction. This will help you pin point what makes a Sue-when it is and isn't appropriate to write certain things. It's kind of harsh sometimes, but it'll help." — @batqurl
  • They say what doesn't kill us makes us who we are
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    "Another great blog to read is Reasoning with Vampires. That one is a tumblog and it basically takes the Twilight Saga apart piece by piece. Not only do you learn about good writing and logic within stories, but you also learn about grammar too!" — @batqurl
  • Cry me, a fucking river.
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    "Figure out what kind of Sue you have on your hands from the above types. Then try to add in other elements to the story, to balance it out and add realism. Add subplots and allow yourself to get involved and attached to other characters." — @batqurl
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    "Look at the big picture. Character development is a huge part of writing. Without it, what point is there? And characters can't develop if everything is handed to them. Make them work for things. Give them adversity." — @batqurl
  • Creatures lie here;
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    "Recognize the difference between you and your character. You are not this character. You will never be this character. And when your characters makes mistakes or bad things happen to her, it's not you." — @batqurl
  • inspireplease: Donnie Darko
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    "You also need to remember something very important: When bad things happen to your character, it shouldn't be just so the audience and other characters can feel bad for her. It should be because it drives the plot forward or causes the character to change in some significant way. There needs to be a point to it." — @batqurl
  • photo
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    "Keep writing! It's the only way you'll get better. The way I see it, you have two options: You can either give up on writing forever because you found out you weren't perfect, OR you can take what you've learned and decide to improve your writing. Or you can just not care and keep writing Mary-Sues but in the interest of good literature, I would not recommend it." — @batqurl

12 comments

angeltomlinson
Wrote one year ago
I saw that, but I think you are right in some points. There a few Mary-sues that aren't young girls, and do that. And I don't Think you are going to the hell because of it darling.

batqurl
Wrote one year ago
@angeltomlinson BECAUSE I HAD CHANGED THE DESCRIPTION AND ADDED A DISCLAIMER SLIDE NOTING THAT MY OPINIONS ON MARY-SUES HAD RADICALLY CHANGED SINCE I MADE THIS COLLECTION THE WHOLE CONCEPT OF A MARY-SUE IS RIDIC AND IM PROBS GOING TO HELL FOR THIS

angeltomlinson
Wrote one year ago
All the descriptions, the pictures ones and of the collection. Why?

batqurl
Wrote one year ago
@angeltomlinson DID YOU READ THE DESCRIPTION OR THE FIRST SLIDE DOES THAT NOT SHOW UP??????????

angeltomlinson
Wrote one year ago
This is so perfect, really, This will help me to avoid having one, and I agree with you. Mary Sue's are a problem.

midnight-owl-94
Wrote three years ago
Thank you for this! This will be a great reference to keep myself from having a sue.

athousandshadesofblue
Wrote three years ago
Favorite collection?
Just found it.

violetbird
Wrote three years ago
Thank you! This completely helped me define the problems that Ihave with certain roleplays ( including my own some days )

batqurl
Wrote three years ago
No problem, and thanks. :3

rainbowpanda0
Wrote three years ago
This is so brilliant, and so so helpful, thank you! A brilliant collection. (: xo

mcfuz
Wrote three years ago
Wow, this is seriously great! (:

georgipotterxoxo
Wrote three years ago
this is an amazing collection!

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