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  • Sons of Anarchy The Official Collectors Edition (Hardcover) Book ShopTV
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  • Mousetronaut Based on a (Partially) True Story (Paula Wiseman Books)
    Mousetronaut: Based on a (Partially) True Story (Paula Wiseman Books) [Mark Kelly, C. F. Payne] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A heartwarming picture book tale of the power of the small, from bestselling author and retired NASA astronaut Commander Mark Kelly. Astronaut Mark Kelly flew with “mice-tronauts” on his first spaceflight aboard space shuttle Endeavour in 2001. Mousetronaut tells the story of a small mouse that wants nothing more than to travel to outer space. The little mouse works as hard as the bigger mice to show readiness for the mission. .. and is chosen for the flight! While in space
  • Wisdom Wednesday A Quote from Albert Einstein Heidi Oran, Writer
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    (source) Albert Einstein was well-known for his groundbreaking work in the field of Science, however, throughout his years he imparted much wisdom to the world - this weeks Wisdom Wednesday quote is one of my favorites. Each of us interpret words to have different meaning - to me this quote is about acknowledging and embracing your uniqueness. I have never been one to fit in with the crowd. From a young age I preferred to spend my hours reading a book while at home, or working in the library during recess while at school. I found my refuge in books which allowed me to perhaps protect what made me different, and keep it sacred. As an adult I have been able dive into whatever adventure I choose, mostly fearless of the outcome. Today I read a new article about youth suicide, which reminded me how difficult it can be for children to comprehend that being different, being unique is a beautiful thing. That perhaps whatever is setting them apart from the crowd will be the catalyst to a life of authenticity and joy. Please share this quote if you know anyone struggling with their own uniqueness or inability to "fit in". Sometimes a gentle reminder is all that is required to help someone move forward. If you would like to link up for Wisdom Wednesday, please do so below!! Thank you!
  • Interview with “Uncle Grandpa” Creator Pete Browngardt Cartoon Brew
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    Uncle Grandpa premieres this evening at 8 p.m. (ET, PT) on Cartoon Network. The show was created by Peter Browngardt, 34, who also voices the handlebar-mustachioed star of the show. Uncle Grandpa has been gestating since 2008 when it was part of Cartoon Network’s Cartoonstitute program. The original pilot gained a following online after it was posted on YouTube in 2010, the same year in which the pilot was nominated for an Emmy. The show revolves around Uncle Grandpa, a fanny pack-adorned, propeller beanie-bedecked gentleman of uncertain origin who travels in a magical RV dispensing ‘Good mornins’ while helping children achieve their dreams. If it sounds like an unconventional setup for a children’s cartoon, the show’s style of humor is even more unique. Surrealist visual humor, the type of which was practiced by cartooning giants like VIP Partch, Tex Avery, and Don Martin, went out of fashion sometime in the late-Eighties. Uncle Grandpa rejuvenates this strand of comedy with gusto: bodies disassemble and reassemble on command, conceited slices of pizza drive motorbikes, and parallel worlds exist in fanny packs (or belly bags, per the show’s lingo). Browngardt’s new show dispenses with the polite verbal banter of other animated TV series; it is visually vulgar and aesthetically abrasive, and because of its sheer audacity, it’s laugh-out-loud funny. Cartoon Brew spoke to Browngardt about the show. We accompany the chat with a gallery of production and pre-production artwork from the series. Cartoon Brew: Did you have an Uncle Grandpa-like figure when you were growing up or is it something that you wish you had? Pete Browngardt: Actually, I think it’s sort of a combination. Growing up, I had uncles, but the funny thing is that neither one of them were actually blood-relatives. They were just my father’s really good friends. I think a lot of people have that, where you just call them Uncle Bob or Uncle Dan or whatever. And these guys were larger-than-life characters. Whenever they came to hang out, it was a nutty time. They let me drive when I was seven years old just to see me drive. We’d build potato cannons and all kinds of stuff that you probably shouldn’t be doing with kids. They were kids at heart as well and they had crazy stories of their life. Like, one of them fought in World War II and hid in a cave, and then got captured and escaped from a POW camp. It was always something adventurous or a good time when they showed up. And then also, I did have a lot of imaginary friends as a kid and I’d go out in the woods and play out scenarios, wishing I could get away. Cartoon Brew: How many ideas had you pitched before you pitched Uncle Grandpa to Cartoon Network? Pete Browngardt: It was my first time ever pitching to a studio. A friend, Stephen DeStefano, had a connection to pitch at the studio. I was living in New York at the time. We flew out, and said, ‘Let’s pitch three ideas each.’ I just did quick pitch bible things for three ideas, and pitched to Craig McCracken and Rob Renzetti. Craig and Rob really responded to Uncle Grandpa. And while I was out there, Carl Greenblatt from Chowder had seen my work and he hired me to board on that. I actually moved out to LA to work on that, and through that time period, Cartoonstitute started. Cartoon Brew: This might be a good moment to talk about your background. I heard you started in animation when you were 19? Pete Browngardt: I started making animated films when I was seven years old. My older brothers were into making films, they used to make Super 8 horror movies, so I was basically born into a household that liked filmmaking, acting and drawing and all these arts…it was odd to me that other families didn’t do it. My brothers explained to me at an early age how animation works, and I was like, ‘Wow, you can actually do this.’ My dad and my brother helped me build a lighttable from the back of the Preston Blair animation book, and one of the first things I ever animated was a character swallowing a bee. I animated dog food falling on a dog. I always drew, and I started mak
  • Book soup Bruno Munari ABC
    In this imaginative ABC, acclaimed artist, designer and children's author, Bruno Munari shows how fun letters can be. From an Ant on an Apple to a Blue Butterfly to a Cat in a Cage, Munari pairs words in whimsical ways until Fly frees itself from its page, lands on the Hat, buzzes near the Ice Cream and provides the final sound for Zzzzz.

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