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  • Ginger Ray Neon Pink Hip Hooray Happy Birthday Napkins
    notonthehighstreet.com
    Striking and bold ""Happy Birthday"" neon paper napkins. Perfect for fabulous birthday parties! Neon Pink Hip Hooray Happy Birthday Napkins
  • Eleanor Stuart Tweedle Twins Alice In Wonderland Plate
    notonthehighstreet.com
    A fine bone china hand decorated illustrated ceramic plate. Made in Stoke on Trent. Tweedle Twins Alice In Wonderland Plate
  • José Joaquim Ribeiro Goa Flatware, 20-Piece Set
    dwr.com
    Constructed of durable brushed stainless steel with sleek black resin handles, Goa Flatware (2010) is produced by a third-generation family-run business that melds solid engineering, modern machining and traditional craftsmanship to stunning effect. The company takes the same precise approach to creating flatware as it would to fashioning tools, evident in Goa’s ergonomic design, perfect balance and meticulous finish. This set includes four five-piece settings, each of which comprises a salad fork, dinner fork, knife, soupspoon and teaspoon. Dishwasher safe. Made in Portugal.
  • Sandy Chilewich Manhattan Tray
    dwr.com
    Over the years, Sandy Chilewich has expanded her tabletop collection with both natural and syntheticin varied textures and colors. Today she continues to redefine how people dress their dining spaces around the world with her innovative textiles. The first in a series from Chilewich called the “Manhattan Tray Project,” the Manhattan Tray (2013) was designed to pair with her ever-growing selection of placemats. When placed into the tray, a rectangular placemat becomes a liner, adding color and texture to whatever you serve. To change the look of the tray, just change the placemat. The Manhattan Tray also stands beautifully on its own, with discreet rubber feet that protect delicate tabletops from marring. Avoid prolonged exposure to moisture. Made in Taiwan.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Corkscrew
    dwr.com
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Serving Tray
    dwr.com
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Ice Bucket
    dwr.com
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Cocktail Mixer with Spoon
    dwr.com
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Ice Tongs
    dwr.com
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Bottle Opener
    dwr.com
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
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  • Iittala Sarjaton Letti Mug - White
    shophorne.com
    Iittala Sarjaton is inspired and shaped by Finnish traditions, with the concept and design for the range firmly rooted in folklore and artisan rituals. The braided Letti designer plates are beautiful to the eye and to the touch. With their raised design, Letti designer plates work just as well on their own as they do with other Sarjaton or Iittala pieces. The Sarjaton design process has been dedicated to creating distinctive objects that offer endless possibilities. Use your imagination to create your own composition, simply by combining patterns, materials and colours. Be bold; the most unexpected combination could be the one you grow to love most.
  • Eva Zeisel Granit 5-Piece Place Setting
    dwr.com
    In 1926, the Kispester-Granit factory in Budapest hired Eva Zeisel, who was 20 years old at the time, as a designer. It was only her first job, but the company was so impressed with her initial work that they created a special art department for her. The employees, who normally produced ceramic sinks, all wanted to work with Zeisel as she brought elegant vases, whimsical rhinoceros-shaped ashtrays and beautiful teapots into the product mix. The factory closed her department after just one year, but the experience sparked a brilliant career. Almost 60 years later, Zeisel returned to the factory and designed the Granit Collection (1983). Though widely exhibited, the set – which features her signature fluid, sensuous curves – wasn’t put into production until 2009. DWR worked closely with Zeisel to ensure that Granit adheres to her exacting standards. “I like the way the very thin, hard edges of the plates change into a soft, inviting bellybutton,” she said. “All the pieces together make a very nice family.” The plates and bowls each feature a dimple in the center, and their matte white finish offers a neutral backdrop for culinary delights. This collection is food, microwave and dishwasher safe. Made in China. This set includes a dinner plate, salad plate, bowl, teacup and saucer.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Extra-Large
    dwr.com
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Medium
    dwr.com
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Extra-Small
    dwr.com
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Large
    dwr.com
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.

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