Dining in is the new going out.

Collection featuring Matthew Hilton Tables, Matthew Hilton Entertainment Units, and 75 other items
  • Design Within Reach: Dining in is the new going out
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Dining in is the new going out
  • Eero Saarinen Saarinen Round Dining Table
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    In a 1956 cover story in Time magazine, Eero Saarinen said that "the underside of typical tables and chairs makes a confusing, unrestful world,” and that he was designing a collection to "clear up the slum of legs in the U.S. home." Later that year, he completed his Pedestal Table (1956) with its cast aluminum base inspired by a drop of high-viscosity liquid. His now-iconic Pedestal Table is made with abrasion-resistant Rilsan® finish on the base and a tabletop made of solid marble, wood veneer or laminate. Each piece is stamped with the KnollStudio logo and Eero Saarinen's signature. These are authentic Pedestal Tables by Knoll. Base made in China; tabletop made in Italy or U.S.A., depending on material. Coated marble tops have a glossy polyester coating, and satin-coated marble tops have a matte satin polyester coating; both types help protect against stains.
  • Matthew Hilton Cross Round Table
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    After earning a degree in furniture design from Kingston Polytechnic in 1979, Matthew Hilton opened a design studio in London, and he’s been creating innovative, classic pieces ever since. His Cross Round Table (2013) is his most recent addition, with a large solid wood tabletop for satisfying heft and crisp unadorned geometry that coordinates well with other furniture in the Cross Collection. Echoing the warmly elegant appearance of his award-winning Extension Table, the Round Table features Hilton’s trademark splayed leg design for an impressive combination of legroom and stability. This table seats up to eight people and, not coincidentally, pairs nicely with the designer’s Profile Chair. Walnut version made in Malaysia, oak version in Lithuania.
  • Line Credenza, Large
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    "I have always been inspired by the language of entertainment units from the 1960s," says Singaporean designer Nathan Yong. Which is a remarkable statement when you learn that Yong grew up in a wooden hut by the sea, where he and his brother made their own toys and "waited for low tides so we could pick up treasures from the shore." When we saw his Media Console , it captivated us with its quiet elegance. In fact, we liked the aesthetic so much that we asked Yong to expand the collection. He responded with the one of the smartest storage options we've ever seen. Available in two sizes, the Small Credenza has two louvered doors with four cubbies and two drawers inside and the Large Credenza has four louvered doors and eight interior cubbies. The louvered design detail also serves a functional purpose, allowing infrared light to reach remote-controlled devices stored inside the credenza. Constructed with leveling floor glides for uneven surfaces. Made in Malaysia.
  • Tom Kelley Salt Table
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    An architect and designer who studied in Germany and California, Tom Kelley now lives and works in Italy. Traveling around the world for different clients, he developed a sense for the essential and important in furniture design. The Salt Table (2009) embodies his “less is more” credo with its unadorned functionality. Specifically crafted to complement the Shaker-style Salt Chair, mimicking its profile and finish, this piece serves well in tight quarters due to its compact size and manageable weight. Ships flat to save on packing; simple assembly required. Made in the Czech Republic.
  • Luciano Bertoncini Min Table, Large
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    In 1972, Luciano Bertoncini’s work was included in "Italy: The New Domestic Landscape,” a legendary MoMA exhibition that included Ettore Sottsass, Gae Aulenti, Mario Bellini and many other groundbreaking designers. The show kicked off Bertoncini’s career, and today he is a furniture designer working from his studio in Treviso. The simplicity of his Min Table (2011) echoes the clean aesthetic of his Min Bed, which has been a best-seller in our assortment since 2003. With its white steel frame and choice of glass or steel tabletop, this versatile table is an apt choice for an elegant dining area or creative workspace. Rounded corners and balanced proportions further its quiet character. The large Min Table seats six (or perhaps eight, depending on your chairs). Ships flat; assembly required. Made in Italy.
  • Matthew Hilton Cross Extension Table
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    With spare clean lines and no decorative excess, Matthew Hilton’s Cross Extension Table (2005) pairs the elegance and warmth of classic English furniture with the simple beauty of 21st-century modernism. This table has a straightforward aesthetic that will suit almost any environment. While the Cross Extension’s strong, unadorned geometry creates a distinctly up-to-date piece, Hilton softens the outline with tapered legs that flare from the base like the supports of traditional pedestal tables. Adaptable to changing dining needs, the tabletop expands with a simple pull, allowing insertion of up to two leaves for three possible table sizes: 78.75", 97.5" and 116". After guests depart, the leaves store in a felt-lined compartment on the table’s underside. The Cross Extension Table received the 2006 Elle Decoration Best in Furniture Award. Walnut table made in Malaysia; others made in Lithuania.
  • Vincent Chia Mapp Table, Medium
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    The mixed-Mapp Table (2011) is the work of Air Division, a studio founded in 1999 by five young designers, including Nathan Yong, designer of our Line Collection. In creating Mapp, Vincent Chia understood our request for a simple table that worked equally well in small and large sizes and gave customers a variety of options. The collection is informed by the clean and simple construction of the Parsons Table, a form designed by Jean-Michel Frank when he was teaching at the Parsons Paris School of Art and Design in the 1930s. Its design features legs positioned at the table ends for maximum legroom, making Mapp suitable for a dining table or office desk. Mapp ships flat to save on packing. Made in U.S.A.
  • Kayu Teak Dining Bench
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    The Kayu Teak Bench (2009) is a combination of straightforward design and robust natural wood. Crafted of solid planks of teak, these pieces are left unfinished to allow for an inviting patina that requires very little maintenance, just soap and water. Both the Bench and coordinating Dining Table (sold separately) are made from Indonesian teak, which is harvested from strictly managed plantations, ensuring the wood’s sustainable origins. Assembly required. Pair with the Kayu Teak Dining Table or use it individually in the entryway or living room. Through sanding – which is the only “processing” done to this wood – natural oils are brought to the surface to create an incredible luster.
  • Charles and Ray Eames Eames® Molded Plastic Dowel-Leg Side Chair (DSW)
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    Charles and Ray Eames believed that "design is a method of action,” and continually updated their work as newbecame available. Their Molded Plastic chairs were originally designed in metal, and entered as a prototype in MoMA’s 1948 International Competition for Low-Cost Furniture Design. They then changed the material to fiberglass in 1950, and today the chairs are made of recyclable polypropylene. Charles was dissatisfied with the fiberglass, and it wasn’t until after his death that the matte finish he desired was achieved, thanks to advances in. "The chair that Charles and Ray were designing,” explains grandson Eames Demetrios, "is the chair that’s made tomorrow. ” The deep seat pocket and waterfall seat edge keep you comfortable by reducing pressure on the backs of thighs. This is an authentic chair by Herman Miller, Inc. Eames is a licensed trademark of Herman Miller. Made in U.S.A. DSW stands for dining height, side chair with wood base.
  • Charles and Ray Eames Eames® Molded Plastic Dowel-Leg Side Chair (DSW)
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Charles and Ray Eames believed that "design is a method of action,” and continually updated their work as newbecame available. Their Molded Plastic chairs were originally designed in metal, and entered as a prototype in MoMA’s 1948 International Competition for Low-Cost Furniture Design. They then changed the material to fiberglass in 1950, and today the chairs are made of recyclable polypropylene. Charles was dissatisfied with the fiberglass, and it wasn’t until after his death that the matte finish he desired was achieved, thanks to advances in. "The chair that Charles and Ray were designing,” explains grandson Eames Demetrios, "is the chair that’s made tomorrow. ” The deep seat pocket and waterfall seat edge keep you comfortable by reducing pressure on the backs of thighs. This is an authentic chair by Herman Miller, Inc. Eames is a licensed trademark of Herman Miller. Made in U.S.A. DSW stands for dining height, side chair with wood base.
  • Charles and Ray Eames Eames® Molded Plastic Dowel-Leg Side Chair (DSW)
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Charles and Ray Eames believed that "design is a method of action,” and continually updated their work as newbecame available. Their Molded Plastic chairs were originally designed in metal, and entered as a prototype in MoMA’s 1948 International Competition for Low-Cost Furniture Design. They then changed the material to fiberglass in 1950, and today the chairs are made of recyclable polypropylene. Charles was dissatisfied with the fiberglass, and it wasn’t until after his death that the matte finish he desired was achieved, thanks to advances in. "The chair that Charles and Ray were designing,” explains grandson Eames Demetrios, "is the chair that’s made tomorrow. ” The deep seat pocket and waterfall seat edge keep you comfortable by reducing pressure on the backs of thighs. This is an authentic chair by Herman Miller, Inc. Eames is a licensed trademark of Herman Miller. Made in U.S.A. DSW stands for dining height, side chair with wood base.
  • Jesús Gasca Globus Chair in Plastic with Stainless Frame
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Introduced in 1994, the Globus Chair has already become a design classic, used in restaurants and public spaces around the world. Most recently, it was installed as the seating at Santiago Calatrava's new pavilion at the Milwaukee Art Museum. The backrest and seat are made from smooth, curving pieces of beech plywood or plastic, molded to provide secure support, while the waterfall seat edge allows for comfort over long periods. The gently curved elliptical hole in the back of the Globus serves multiple purposes beyond its unique design: It allows for additional ventilation and the alleviation of back pressure, and it can be used as a handle for easy maneuvering. Attachments on the seat bottom prevent damage during stacking and plastic glides protect floors. Choose the plastic Globus Chair with stainless frame for use outdoors. Contract quality. Design Within Reach is proud to be the exclusive retailer of Stua products in the U.S. Made in Spain.
  • Jesús Gasca Globus Chair in Wood with Chrome Frame
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    "Good design is not only about beautiful shapes," says Jesús Gasca of Stua (Solo Tengo Un Amor: I have only one love), the furniture company he founded 30 years ago. "It always has to be clever in the solution of functional questions." To find both, look no further than the Globus (1994) – a chair with beauty and brains. The elliptical hole in the back serves multiple purposes beyond its unique design: It allows for additional ventilation, alleviates pressure on the spine and can be used as a handle when moving the chair. The curving backrest and waterfall seat edge also ensure lasting comfort. Globus has already become a design classic, used worldwide in homes and public spaces, including the Time Warner headquarters in New York and Santiago Calatrava's pavilion at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Made in Spain. Now available in new colors (the first ones in 10 years) that were chosen by Stua fans worldwide, who voted for their favorite hues. in the U.S.
  • Jesús Gasca Globus Chair in Wood with Chrome Frame
    SOLD OUT: More info
    "Good design is not only about beautiful shapes," says Jesús Gasca of Stua (Solo Tengo Un Amor: I have only one love), the furniture company he founded 30 years ago. "It always has to be clever in the solution of functional questions." To find both, look no further than the Globus (1994) – a chair with beauty and brains. The elliptical hole in the back serves multiple purposes beyond its unique design: It allows for additional ventilation, alleviates pressure on the spine and can be used as a handle when moving the chair. The curving backrest and waterfall seat edge also ensure lasting comfort. Globus has already become a design classic, used worldwide in homes and public spaces, including the Time Warner headquarters in New York and Santiago Calatrava's pavilion at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Made in Spain. Now available in new colors (the first ones in 10 years) that were chosen by Stua fans worldwide, who voted for their favorite hues. in the U.S.
  • Jesús Gasca Globus Chair in Wood with Chrome Frame
    SOLD OUT: More info
    "Good design is not only about beautiful shapes," says Jesús Gasca of Stua (Solo Tengo Un Amor: I have only one love), the furniture company he founded 30 years ago. "It always has to be clever in the solution of functional questions." To find both, look no further than the Globus (1994) – a chair with beauty and brains. The elliptical hole in the back serves multiple purposes beyond its unique design: It allows for additional ventilation, alleviates pressure on the spine and can be used as a handle when moving the chair. The curving backrest and waterfall seat edge also ensure lasting comfort. Globus has already become a design classic, used worldwide in homes and public spaces, including the Time Warner headquarters in New York and Santiago Calatrava's pavilion at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Made in Spain. Now available in new colors (the first ones in 10 years) that were chosen by Stua fans worldwide, who voted for their favorite hues. in the U.S.
  • Series 7 Chair in Colored Ash
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    The Series 7 Chair debuted in 1955 at the H55 exhibition in Sweden, and the appeal of what remains one of the most copied chairs of the modern era is its shape. The chair is ideally suited to the human body, its seatback has a comfortable “give,” and its waterfall seat edge doesn’t press into legs. Arne Jacobsen, who was instilled with a love of materials, shaped the core of Danish design identity when he accommodated three different bends in one piece of plywood, simply by narrowing the chair back. Once painstakingly made by hand, the Series 7 is now produced using automation methods borrowed from the German car industry and monitored by a team that ensures the authentic Series 7 is perfect every time. Suitable for contract use. Stacks six high. This is the authentic Series 7 Collection by Republic of Fritz Hansen. Made in Denmark.
  • Salt Chair
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    The compact footprint of the Salt Chair makes it a smart choice for cafes or any location where you want to seat as many people as possible around a table or in a defined space. Unlike chairs that have widely splayed legs, Salt chairs can be placed next to each other without wasting a lot of space in between. This Shaker-style chair is a timeless classic, and its lack of ornament and unnecessary excess makes it befitting of the modern aesthetic. It is finished in a water-based opaque paint that really makes the Chair’s profile pop. The color may appear inconsistent with the name of this item, but this Chair is as fundamental as the salt shaker on your table. The Salt Chair is unpretentious, familiar and made for everyday use. Made in the Czech Republic.
  • Salt Chair
    SOLD OUT: More info
    The compact footprint of the Salt Chair makes it a smart choice for cafes or any location where you want to seat as many people as possible around a table or in a defined space. Unlike chairs that have widely splayed legs, Salt chairs can be placed next to each other without wasting a lot of space in between. This Shaker-style chair is a timeless classic, and its lack of ornament and unnecessary excess makes it befitting of the modern aesthetic. It is finished in a water-based opaque paint that really makes the Chair’s profile pop. The color may appear inconsistent with the name of this item, but this Chair is as fundamental as the salt shaker on your table. The Salt Chair is unpretentious, familiar and made for everyday use. Made in the Czech Republic.
  • Emeco 111 Navy Chair®
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    Made from 111 recycled plastic Coke® bottles, this chair is the result of a special collaboration between Emeco and Coca-Cola®. It took four years of research, design and testing to create it, the production of which keeps three million plastic bottles out of landfills every year. The 111 Navy Chair (2010) not only celebrates the iconic form of the aluminum 1006 Navy® Chair designed in 1944 but also adds a pop (pun intended) of color. One of the few plastic chairs to be built with leg stretchers, this chair will stand up to frequent use. Red, white and flint are suitable for outdoor use. This is the authentic 111 Navy Chair by Emeco. Made in U.S.A. The Navy Chair design constitutes the proprietary Trade Dress of Emeco, making it illegal for another company to clone this chair.
  • Bertoia Side Chair with Seat Pad- Vinyl
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    Harry Bertoia (1915-1978) made a foray into furniture design in the 1950s with Knoll Associates that, while brief, was so powerful and enduring that the royalties alone from his series allowed him to turn his attention to sculpture for the rest of his life. Born in Italy, Bertoia moved with his parents to America in 1930 and he attended Cass Technical High School in Detroit. On a scholarship, he went to the Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1937. When he started, he concentrated on printmaking and dra
  • Josef Hoffmann Hoffmann Armchair
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    Josef Hoffmann is well known for the simple, restrained, yet visually interesting dining chairs – several intended for cafés – that he designed early in the 20th century. The influence of the Arts and Crafts movement can be seen in his work, but Hoffmann also embraced the industrial age. Rather than rejecting traditional decoration, he succeeded in making it serve structural principles, which he believed should determine the forms of buildings, interiors and objects. Whether admiring one of his chairs or the Sanatorium Purkersdorf he designed in 1903, you can see Hoffmann’s emphasis on straight, unadorned lines, characteristics that are in keeping with the style of the Viennese Secession. The Hoffmann Armchair (1925), designed in collaboration with Josef Frank, is made at the bentwood factory founded by Michael Thonet in 1861. Made in the Czech Republic.
  • Alexander Begge Casalino Chair
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    Alexander Begge, born in 1941, designed only one collection before abandoning his career in design. “Not a single drawing I made,” he recounts while describing the process that led to his Casalino Chair (1971). “I had this image of a wisp of fog, and elaborated on that. It brought so much joy, I was in a glow.” In the year it was designed, the Casalino Chair won the Good Industrial Form award at the Hanover Fair in Germany. Popular in the ’70s but forgotten in the ’80s, Casalino has returned. After deciding to reintroduce it, the company Casala searched for the original molds and found them at a depot in Antalya, Turkey. Casalino was brought back into production in 2007 and once again made available in the U.S. by DWR in early 2013. This elegant yet robust cantilevered chair features a flowing shape with no sharp corners. Lightweight, stackable and easy to clean, Casalino works well in a variety of indoor spaces. It’s constructed of impact-resistant polypropylene with a padded fabric seat for durability and comfort. Made in Germany.
  • Matthew Hilton Profile Chair
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    Matthew Hilton created the Profile Chair (2005) to accompany his Cross Extension Table, which was honored with the 2006 Elle Decoration Best in Furniture Award. An ergonomic solution for dining, this chair is simply shaped with splayed legs and an angled back that’s curved for comfortable support. The padded seat is upholstered in aniline-dyed leather, while the durably constructed frame is made of solid oak or walnut. Choose from three finishes: walnut with a black leather seat, oak with a chocolate leather seat and wenge-stained oak with a black leather seat. The Profile Chair is conveniently stackable up to six high. Made in Lithuania.
  • Mika Tolvanen Visu Chair with Wire Base
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    Designer Mika Tolvanen established his Helsinki-based design office in 2001, shortly after graduating with a master’s from the Royal College of Art. In creating the Visu Chair (2012) – which is named after visu , the Finnish word for "precision” – "the task was to create a personal interpretation of the ever-relevant plywood chair,” he says. What he created are actually two different chairs: an unupholstered version with wire base and an upholstered version with wood base. Both are suitable for use in a home, restaurant or office. The unupholstered version with wire base stacks up to 14 high. Made in Lithuania.
  • Mika Tolvanen Visu Chair with Wood Base
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Designer Mika Tolvanen established his Helsinki-based design office in 2001, shortly after graduating with a master’s from the Royal College of Art. In creating the Visu Chair (2012) – which is named after visu , the Finnish word for “precision” – “the task was to create a personal interpretation of the ever-relevant plywood chair,” he says. What he created are actually two different chairs: an unupholstered version with wire base and an upholstered version with wood base. Both are suitable for use in a home, restaurant or office. The unupholstered version with wire base stacks up to 14 high. Made in Lithuania.
  • Nathan Yong Line Wine Bar
    SOLD OUT: More info
    "I have always been inspired by the language of turntables and entertainment units from the 1960s," says Singaporean designer Nathan Yong. Which is a remarkable statement when you learn that Yong grew up in a wooden hut by the sea, where he and his brother made their own toys and "waited for low tides so we could pick up treasures from the shore." Growing up with the beach as entertainment, Yong has developed into a resourceful designer, whose work captivated us with its quiet elegance. At Salone del Mobile , the annual furniture fair in Milan, Yong showed his Line Media Console, inspired by "the fluid streamlined forms of 1960s stereo components." We liked the aesthetic so much that we asked Yong to expand the collection. He responded with one of the best-looking bars we've ever seen. The Line Wine Bar (2010) has two drawers with leather pulls, one open cubby, two storage racks for stemware and two storage racks for a total of 24 bottles, twice the storage as the Line Bar. (The bottle storage racks are removable.) Made in Malaysia.
  • Nathan Yong Line Bar
    SOLD OUT: More info
    "I have always been inspired by the language of turntables and entertainment units from the 1960s," says Singaporean designer Nathan Yong. Which is a remarkable statement when you learn that Yong grew up in a wooden hut by the sea, where he and his brother made their own toys and "waited for low tides so we could pick up treasures from the shore." Growing up with the beach as entertainment, Yong has developed into a resourceful designer, whose work captivated us with its quiet elegance. At Salone del Mobile , the annual furniture fair in Milan, Yong showed his Line Media Console, inspired by "the fluid streamlined forms of 1960s stereo components." We liked the aesthetic so much that we asked Yong to expand the collection. He responded with one of the best-looking bars we've ever seen. The Line Bar (2010) has two drawers with leather pulls, three open cubbies, a storage rack for stemware and a storage rack for 12 bottles. (The bottle storage racks are removable.) Made in Malaysia.
  • Nathan Yong Line Credenza, Large
    SOLD OUT: More info
    “I have always been inspired by the simple forms of turntables and entertainment units from the 1960s,” says designer Nathan Yong – a remarkable statement when you learn that Yong grew up in a wooden hut by the sea, where he and his brother made their own toys and “waited for low tides so we could pick up treasures from the shore.” Growing up with the beach as entertainment, Yong developed into a resourceful designer, whose work captivated us with its quiet elegance. At Salone del Mobile , the annual furniture fair in Milan, Yong showed us his Line Media Console, and we liked the aesthetic so much that we asked him to expand the collection. Another smart storage option, the Line Large Credenza (2010) has four louvered doors and eight cubbies. The louvered design also serves a functional purpose, allowing infrared light to reach remote-controlled devices stored inside. Constructed with leveling floor glides for uneven surfaces. Made in Malaysia.
  • Merete Erbou Laurent Two Ways Mat
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    As a textile designer with a special focus on pictorial weaving and tapestry, Merete Erbou Laurent is always experimenting with newand techniques. She started working with paper yarn after studying at the Århus School of Architecture, satisfying her interest in rugs with a fascination for light, space and color. From her Studio in the Danish countryside, Laurent has a beautiful view of a distant horizon under a lofty sky. It is this landscape that inspired her Two Ways Mat (2010), in which you can see the clear lines of the fields, where colors and textures change with the seasons. Each Mat is made of three shades of paper yarn: a strong florescent color combined with natural and grey strands. The resulting weave has a unique look, and as you walk around the Mat you see different combinations of the colors. The “two ways” refers to the fact that these mats are reversible – one side is more neutral, the other more colorful. The lightfast, hypoallergenic paper has a protective coating to help keep dirt particles from settling into the yarns. Made in India.
  • George Nelson and Associates Nelson Pear Pendant Lamp
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    Architect George Nelson, who was Herman Miller’s design director from 1946 to 1972, said: "Every truly original idea seems to find its most important expression in a chair.” And then he blew the doors off lighting design. When Nelson was outfitting his office, he coveted a silk-covered Swedish hanging lamp but found it prohibitively expensive. He then recalled seeing a photo in the paper of Liberty ships being mothballed "by having the decks covered with netting and then being sprayed with a self-webbing plastic,” said Nelson. "And then, Whammo!” Inspiration struck, and by the next night, Nelson had designed his first Bubble Lamp® (1947), using a spray coating of translucent plastic polymer over a skeleton of steel wire. "When you put a light in it, it glowed.” A wide range of shapes and sizes are now available. UL Listed. Bulb (not included): incandescent 150W/120V/E26/A21 max. Made in U.S.A. The Nelson Triple Bubble Fixture Kit (sold separately) accommodates three Nelson Ball, Cigar, Pear, Saucer or Lantern hanging pendants that are 19" in diameter or smaller.
  • George Nelson Associates Nelson Propeller Pendant Lamp
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Architect George Nelson, who was Herman Miller’s design director from 1945 to 1972, once said, “Every truly original idea seems to find its most important expression in a chair.” And then he blew the doors off lighting design. While outfitting his office, Nelson discovered a silk-covered Swedish hanging lamp that he coveted but found too expensive. He then recalled seeing a photo in the paper of Liberty ships being mothballed “by having the decks covered with netting and then being sprayed with a self-webbing plastic,” which got him thinking. “And then, Whammo!” Inspiration struck, and by the next night, Nelson had designed his first Bubble Lamp® (1952) by spinning a skeleton of steel wires on a turntable and shooting it with translucent plastic until it was covered in a smooth, washable film. “When you put a light in it, it glowed.” This is the authentic Bubble Lamp, produced in partnership with the George Nelson Foundation. Bulb (not included): LED, CFL or incandescent; E26 base; 150W max. UL Listed. Made in U.S.A.
  • Nelson Ball Pendant Lamp - Medium
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    In 1947, when George Nelson embarked on the task of decorating his newly opened office in mid-town Manhattan, he found the silk-covered Swedish hanging lamp that he coveted to be prohibitively expensive. So he decided to design his own. The "bubble" lamps, as they were called, were first introduced in 1950 by the Howard Miller Company (brother of Herman Miller, Howard Miller also first launched Nelson's renowned series of clocks). Using a spray coating of translucent plastic polymer over a skeleton of steel wire, Nelson created an alternative to traditional pendants and chandeliers, offering large-scale, diffuse lighting for all size and manner of interiors. A wide range of shapes and sizes are now available. Bulb (not included): incandescent 150W/120V/E26/A21. Made in U.S.A.
  • George Nelson and Associates Nelson Crisscross Cigar Pendant Lamp
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Architect George Nelson, who was Herman Miller’s design director from 1946 to 1972, said: "Every truly original idea seems to find its most important expression in a chair.” And then he blew the doors off lighting design. When Nelson was outfitting his office, he coveted a silk-covered Swedish hanging lamp but found it prohibitively expensive. He then recalled seeing a photo in the paper of Liberty ships being mothballed "by having the decks covered with netting and then being sprayed with a self-webbing plastic,” said Nelson. "And then, Whammo!” Inspiration struck, and by the next night, Nelson had designed his first Bubble Lamp® (1947), using a spray coating of translucent plastic polymer over a skeleton of steel wire. "When you put a light in it, it glowed.” A wide range of shapes and sizes are now available. UL Listed. Bulb (not included): incandescent 150W/120V/E26/A21 max. Made in U.S.A. The Nelson Triple Bubble Fixture Kit (sold separately) accommodates three Nelson Ball, Cigar, Pear, Saucer or Lantern hanging pendants that are 19" in diameter or smaller.
  • George Nelson and Associates Nelson Lantern Pendant Lamp
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Architect George Nelson, who was Herman Miller’s design director from 1946 to 1972, said: "Every truly original idea seems to find its most important expression in a chair.” And then he blew the doors off lighting design. When Nelson was outfitting his office, he coveted a silk-covered Swedish hanging lamp but found it prohibitively expensive. He then recalled seeing a photo in the paper of Liberty ships being mothballed "by having the decks covered with netting and then being sprayed with a self-webbing plastic,” said Nelson. "And then, Whammo!” Inspiration struck, and by the next night, Nelson had designed his first Bubble Lamp® (1947), using a spray coating of translucent plastic polymer over a skeleton of steel wire. "When you put a light in it, it glowed.” A wide range of shapes and sizes are now available. UL Listed. Bulb (not included): incandescent 150W/120V/E26/A21 max. Made in U.S.A. The Nelson Triple Bubble Fixture Kit (sold separately) accommodates three Nelson Ball, Cigar, Pear, Saucer or Lantern hanging pendants that are 19" in diameter or smaller.
  • George Nelson and Associates Nelson Crisscross Pear Pendant Lamp
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Architect George Nelson, who was Herman Miller’s design director from 1946 to 1972, said: "Every truly original idea seems to find its most important expression in a chair.” And then he blew the doors off lighting design. When Nelson was outfitting his office, he coveted a silk-covered Swedish hanging lamp but found it prohibitively expensive. He then recalled seeing a photo in the paper of Liberty ships being mothballed "by having the decks covered with netting and then being sprayed with a self-webbing plastic,” said Nelson. "And then, Whammo!” Inspiration struck, and by the next night, Nelson had designed his first Bubble Lamp® (1947), using a spray coating of translucent plastic polymer over a skeleton of steel wire. "When you put a light in it, it glowed.” A wide range of shapes and sizes are now available. UL Listed. Bulb (not included): incandescent 150W/120V/E26/A21 max. Made in U.S.A. The Nelson Triple Bubble Fixture Kit (sold separately) accommodates three Nelson Ball, Cigar, Pear, Saucer or Lantern hanging pendants that are 19" in diameter or smaller.
  • Claesson Koivisto Rune Fluid Pendant
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    “We wanted to give the lamp a form with a certain softness, towards a more natural language and further removed from pure geometry,” says the team behind the Fluid Pendant (2011), Claesson Koivisto Rune. “Fascinated by the way that surface tension governs the curvature of a resting water droplet, we have tried to capture its essence.” With movement, flow and a respect for the beauty that comes with handcrafting, the team has created a versatile opalescent glass pendant. In its simplicity of form and color – all parts of the lamp, including the cord, are white – the Fluid Pendant creates a warm, inviting glow for the dining room, kitchen or anywhere else soft lighting is desired. Claesson Koivisto Rune is an innovative Swedish design house, founded in Stockholm in 1995. “The only things that are important to us,” says the company, “are to develop, to improve and never to repeat.” Bulb (not included): incandescent 60W/120V/E26/A19 max. Made in China.
  • Satellite Chandelier
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    In 1957, The Soviet Union launched the world's first man-made object to orbit the earth. The satellite was about the size of a beach ball, had whisker-like long antennas extending from one side and each of its 1440 elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 98 minutes. Its launch marked the start of the Space Age, led directly to the creation of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and kicked off a worldwide fascination with space travel. It also inspired a design aesthetic based on these rocket-propelled devices, which brought new shapes to furniture, lighting and other household items. Our Satellite collection (2010) – while not constructed of hermetically sealed aluminum-magnesium-titanium, as the Soviets' satellite was – captures the spirit and design ethos of the time. The Satellite Chandelier has 24 antennae arms. UL Listed. Bulbs (not included): 24 x 25W candelabra. Made in China.
  • Unfold Pendant
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    Form Us With Love is a Swedish design house that was started in 2005 by Jonas Pettersson, John Löfgren and Petrus Palmér. The trio seeks ways to challenge the conventional as they design everyday objects and lighting. An example of their unusual approach is the Unfold Pendant (2010), a classic industrial design that’s been reinterpreted in a surprising material. Made of soft silicone rubber, the lamp arrives squished in a box. When you lift the lamp out of the box, it unfolds into shape. The frosted opal diffuser hides the bulb and emits a soft ambient light. The Form Us With Love design studio has been recognized with several design prizes, including the Young Swedish Design Award in 2006, Red Dot Design Award in 2007 and an I.D. Magazine honorable mention in 2010. Bulb (not included): max 100W. Made in China. The Unfold Pendant requires hardwire installation. Comes with a matte white ceiling canopy. Mounts to a standard electrical junction box.
  • Claus Bonderup and Torsten Thorup Semi Pendant
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    Architects Claus Bonderup and Torsten Thorup were students at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts when they co-designed their first lamp. Craving pure, crisp geometric shapes in a design world dominated by soft organic forms, they created the Semi Pendant (1968) by placing two circles back to back, producing an elegant shape in the negative space between with a diameter matching that of each circle. Timeless by design, "it just has that simplicity of form, which cannot be slotted into any single style period,” says Bonderup. It’s not surprising that Semi took first prize in the School of Architecture’s 1968 design competition with its satisfying, perfectly balanced proportions. Bulb (not included): incandescent 40W/120V/E14 for small lamp, incandescent 60W/120V/E27 for others. UL Listed. Made in Denmark. Ceiling rose is matte black for all pendants except matte white pendant; ceiling rose for matte white pendant is matte white.
  • Herbert Krenchel Large Krenit Bowls, Set of 3
    SOLD OUT: More info
    "I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. "The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: "I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. "A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark. Set includes Medium Red, Large Turquoise and Extra-Large Black Krenit Bowls.
  • Herbert Krenchel Small Krenit Bowls, Set of 3
    SOLD OUT: More info
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark. Set includes Extra-Small Orange, Small Light Blue and Medium White Krenit Bowls.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Large
    SOLD OUT: More info
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Medium
    SOLD OUT: More info
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Small
    SOLD OUT: More info
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Extra-Small
    SOLD OUT: More info
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Extra-Large
    SOLD OUT: More info
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Bottle Opener
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Corkscrew
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Ice Tongs
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Shin and Tomoko Azumi LEM Piston Stool with Leather Seat
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Shin and Tomoko Azumi have brought innovation to a range of products, from subwoofer speakers to salt and pepper shakers to their LEM Piston Stool (2000). Named Product of the Year at the FX International Interior Design Awards in the year of its release, the often copied LEM Piston Stool reveals a rigorous and original rethinking of the form and function of seating. The sculptural seat not only swivels but also adjusts easily from counter height to bar height with a lever that activates a gas cylinder. While utility strongly determines its form, this unique stool also has a visual lightness that creates the illusion of freedom from gravity. After designing the LEM Piston Stool, Shin and Tomoko Azumi dissolved their partnership to start solo practices, and they both still develop furniture, lighting and interiors for clients worldwide. LEM is included in the permanent collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in Italy.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Ice Bucket
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Serving Tray
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Coasters, Set of 6
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Arne Jacobsen and Peter Holmblad Cylinda Line Cocktail Mixer with Spoon
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Originally sketched on a napkin in 1964, it took three years and new technology to make Arne Jacobsen’s Cylinda Line (1967) stainless steel barware possible to produce. Jacobsen insisted on seamless tubes with perfect brushed surfaces, and he continued to add new pieces – some designed by Peter Holmblad – to the collection until 1974. An immediate success, Cylinda Line was awarded the 1967 ID Prize by the Danish Design Council, and pieces of the line are included in the permanent collections of MoMA and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Made in China.
  • Almoco Flatware
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Set your table with conversation-starter flatware in your choice of color – silver evokes a timeless aesthetic, and the others lend a unique twist. Almoco Flatware (2001) is the work of a third-generation family-run business in Portugal. All pieces are nicely weighted to provide a satisfying, balanced feeling in your hand. Crafted of durable stainless steel, the knife is type 420, and the forks and spoons are type 304. This setting comprises a salad fork, dinner fork, knife, soupspoon and teaspoon packaged in an elegant red gift box. Dishwasher safe (see care instructions at right). Made in Portugal. DWR Exclusive
  • Almoco Flatware
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Set your table with conversation-starter flatware in your choice of color – silver evokes a timeless aesthetic, and the others lend a unique twist. Almoco Flatware (2001) is the work of a third-generation family-run business in Portugal. All pieces are nicely weighted to provide a satisfying, balanced feeling in your hand. Crafted of durable stainless steel, the knife is type 420, and the forks and spoons are type 304. This setting comprises a salad fork, dinner fork, knife, soupspoon and teaspoon packaged in an elegant red gift box. Dishwasher safe (see care instructions at right). Made in Portugal. DWR Exclusive
  • Almoco Flatware
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Set your table with conversation-starter flatware in your choice of color – silver evokes a timeless aesthetic, and the others lend a unique twist. Almoco Flatware (2001) is the work of a third-generation family-run business in Portugal. All pieces are nicely weighted to provide a satisfying, balanced feeling in your hand. Crafted of durable stainless steel, the knife is type 420, and the forks and spoons are type 304. This setting comprises a salad fork, dinner fork, knife, soupspoon and teaspoon packaged in an elegant red gift box. Dishwasher safe (see care instructions at right). Made in Portugal. DWR Exclusive
  • Doshi Levien Century Flatware, 5-Piece Setting
    SOLD OUT: More info
    Doshi Levien is a London-based design studio founded in 2000 by Nipa Doshi and Jonathan Levien. Their first commission came from Tom Dixon, and their roster of internationally acclaimed clients has continued to grow ever since. For Herdmar, they were invited to design a special collection to celebrate the company’s 100 years of cutlery expertise and manufacturing, and Century Flatware (2011) was born. This was the first time that the family-owned business worked with outsourced designers, and all parties agree that the result is both a celebration of the future and a tribute to the past. The graceful form of this set was inspired by the shape of a plane’s propeller, resulting in balanced tools that are as pleasing to hold as they are to look at. Crafted of durable stainless steel, the knife is type 420, and the forks and spoons are type 304. The set comes packaged in an elegant red gift box. Dishwasher safe. Made in Portugal.
  • Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
  • Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
  • Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
  • Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
  • Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
  • Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
  • Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
  • Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
  • Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
  • Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
  • Design Within Reach Lighting
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    Design Within Reach Lighting
  • Design Within Reach Lighting
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    Design Within Reach Lighting
  • Design Within Reach Dining
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    Design Within Reach Dining
  • Design Within Reach Entertaining
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    Design Within Reach Entertaining
  • Design Within Reach Entertaining
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    Design Within Reach Entertaining
  • Design Within Reach Entertaining
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    Design Within Reach Entertaining
  • Design Within Reach Barware
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    Design Within Reach Barware

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