futabaya Bokashikiku / Green Linen & Cotton Scarf
  • futabaya Ribon / Gray silk scarf
    boticca.com
    "It Began as a fashion for the Samurai families. Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • futabaya HanaKasa / Pink wool scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • futabaya FusekataHana / Gray & Pink wool scarf
    boticca.com
    Begun as a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • futabaya HanaKasa / Brown wool scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion that was started by the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed onto textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and more ostentatious colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • futabaya FusekataHana / Brown & Saxe wool scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon was first dyed onto textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and more ostentatious colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • Martha Lux
    Styling idea
  • futabaya CheckerCircle / Blue silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • Gina Bacconi Chiffon Shawl, Pink
    johnlewis.com
    Add a beautiful finishing flourish to your special outfits this season with this gorgeous Gina Bacconi shawl, fashioned in a soft chiffon it boasts a floating waterfall design and a pretty sheer texture. Perfect layered over the shoulders of your spring shift dresses. Length: 50cms Brand : Gina Bacconi. Material : 100% Polyester. Scarf Fabric : Chiffon. Scarf Type : Shawl. Washing Instructions : Hand wash.
  • futabaya CheckerCircle / Camel silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • John Lewis Occasion Wrap Scarf, Purple
    johnlewis.com
    Perfect for that elegant finishing touch, this super-soft wool mix wrap scarf by John Lewis will add a dose of bold colour to your looks. Drape over the shoulders for a beautiful finishing layer. Material : 50% wool, 50% viscose. Scarf Fabric : Wool mix. Scarf Type : Pashminas & Wraps. Washing Instructions : Dry clean only.
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  • futabaya Isekiku / Beige silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • udobuy
    Styling idea
  • LOUVEDENORDNEG Colibri Noblesse Scarf
    notjustalabel.com
    Made of luxury silk chiffon, this scarf design features mixed media including a veil, withered petals, inks and paper. The scarf captivates with its beautiful and vivid colours and is finished with sewn hems.
  • futabaya Isekiku / Blue silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • DESTIN ombre effect scarf
    farfetch.com
    People also liked
    Orange cashmere blend scarf from Destin featuring an ombre effect throughout and raw edges. Measures approx. 60" W x 72" L.
  • EPICES SAVANNAH SCARF
    calypsostbarth.com
    Add a touch of print and color to your outfit with this linen cotton blend scarf. Floral bunches in mustard, green and berry hues are highlighted with shades of blue on a white base. This garden inspired print embodies a scenic view with an artistic flare. Scarf is finished with a fringe trim.
  • Burberry Prorsum Hearts Jacquard Cashmere Scarf
    mytheresa.com
    Over the lapels of a tailored coat, Burberry Prorsum's heart-jacquard cashmere scarf will make a playful statement. The rich merlot and white colour contrast is made for fall. Fringed edges. 100% Cashmere. Dry clean. Length 105cm-41.5" x Width 16cm-6.25"
  • Marc by Marc Jacobs Diamond Flame Print Scarf
    marcjacobs.com
    Soft, lightweight scarf featuring our all-over Diamond Flame print. 80% Cotton, 20% Silk Voile. 130 x 160 cm.
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    • Marni Gold-tone horn and glass crystal clip earrings
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    • Tibi Bonded PVC pencil skirt
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  • DOLCE & GABBANA Square scarf
    thecorner.com
    Cotton twill. Leopard design. Logo print. Composition: 100% Silk. Measurements: Height: 27.3 Inches, Width: 27.3 Inches.
  • ARMANI COLLEZIONI Two-Tone Cotton And Linen Scarf
    armani.com
    Composition: 55% linen, 45% cotton. Gauze, herringbone, logo detail, fringe.
  • Faliero Sarti Shirly Linen & Cotton Scarf in Grey & Pink
    forwardforward.com
    56% linen 44% cotton. Made in Italy. Measures approx 66"W x 69"L. Fringed ends.
  • LE.SENS Inka scarf
    farfetch.com
    Inka scarf in white smoke from Le. Sens. This cotton scarf features a dragonfly front print, and wrinkled detail. Measures: 38" W x 64" L.
  • GIORGIO ARMANI check scarf
    farfetch.com
    Brown wool and silk blend check scarf from Giorgio Armani featuring fringed edges.
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    Collection
  • Thomas Paul Magpies Wool Scarf
    shopthomaspaul.com
    Our extra long wool scarves are made of a fine merino wool and are hand silk-screened with a custom Thomaspaul print. At 110" long, there's plenty of scarf to wrap around several times, or just let it hang down to see the full animal parade. Lightweight 100% cotton. Color: Jade. Size: 20"x110". Dry clean.
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