futabaya Hanakasa / Green Wool Scarf
  • KENZO Oblong scarf
    yoox.com
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    Composition: 100% Cotton. Details: jacquard, gauze, multicolor pattern, logo detail, fringe. Measurements: Height: 10.92 inches Length: 70.2 inches.
  • DIANE VON FURSTENBERG Tasseled Circle Scarf
    dvf.com
    Put a playful twist on your look with the lightweight Circle scarf. This best-selling infinity style is updated in of the moment prints. In a soft, lightweight wool blend. 70% Wool 30% Viscose.
  • FRONT ROW SOCIETY Stole
    yoox.com
    Composition: 100% Cashmere. Details: flannel, multicolor pattern, fringe, logo detail. Measurements: Height: 39 inches Width: 78 inches.
  • Pattern Scarf YellowGreen
    yesstyle.com
    Brand from Hong Kong: Le Teresa. Color: N/A, Materials: 100% Polyester, Size: N/A, Care: Hand Wash, Machine Wash
  • FRONT ROW SOCIETY Stole
    yoox.com
    Composition: 100% Cashmere. Details: flannel, multicolor pattern, fringe. Measurements: Height: 39 inches Width: 78 inches.
  • Ottotredici Puppy-Print Scarf
    barneys.com
    Ottotredici scarf crafted of purple, all-over brown, beige and black puppy-print modal-cashmere blend. Self-fringe edges. 70" length x 56" width (approximately) Available in Purple/Multi. Modal/cashmere. Machine wash. Made in Italy.
  • MANOSTORTI Stole
    yoox.com
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    Composition: 100% Cashmere. Details: lightweight sweater, solid color, no appliqués. Measurements: Height: 25.35 inches Width: 78 inches.
  • futabaya Ribon / Gray silk scarf
    boticca.com
    "It Began as a fashion for the Samurai families. Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • BALMAIN Square scarf
    yoox.com
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    Composition: 90% Modal, 10% Cashmere. Details: plain weave, multicolor pattern, no appliqués. Measurements: Height: 46.8 inches Width: 46.8 inches.
  • Free Press Peacock Feathers Infinity Scarf
    nordstromrack.com
    - Infinity construction Feather print. Approx. 65" L x 20" W. Imported. Fiber Content: 100% polyester. Care: Machine wash.
  • futabaya CheckerCircle / Blue silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • Allegri
    Styling idea
  • TATE Gary Hume Tulips silk scarf Oblong scarf
    yoox.com
    Design by Gary Hume. Composition: 100% Silk. Details: no appliqués, multicolor pattern. Measurements: Height: 33.54 inches Width: 33.54 inches.
  • Reed Krakoff RK Scarf
    reedkrakoff.com
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    RK cashmere silk scarf. 70% Cashmere; 30% Silk. Size: 68cm x 210cm
  • futabaya CheckerCircle / Camel silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • MISSONI Stole
    yoox.com
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    Composition: 42% Acrylic, 30% Mohair wool , 28% Polyamide. Details: multicolor pattern, no appliqués. Measurements: Height: 21.84 inches Length: 74.1 inches.
  • Ketzali Rust & Gold Scarf
    ahalife.com
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    Made of 100% rayon. Handmade using low and no impact dyes. Dimensions: 72 x 30 inches/182.88 x 76.2 cm.
  • futabaya FusekataHana / Brown & Saxe wool scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon was first dyed onto textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and more ostentatious colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • Untitled #3607
    Styling idea
  • JOHN RICHMOND Square scarf
    yoox.com
    Composition: 100% Silk. Details: satin, multicolor pattern, logo detail. Measurements: Height: 25.35 inches Width: 25.35 inches.
  • ModCloth Nautical Bow to Stern Scarf
    modcloth.com
    Youll be the ranking skipper of style when youre seen waving from the deck in this darling scarf! When worn in a billowing bow around your neck, this polka-dotted, mustard look adds a nostalgic touch to any nautically inspired ensemble. Cinch this silky neck scarf over a pale blue blouse with high-waisted shorts, a bounty of wooden bangles, and cork-soled wedges for a look that will make that armada of admirers seem to lose their sea legs! Nautical Bow to Stern Scarf in Mustard Dots in Yellow for Casual occasions.
  • futabaya FusekataHana / Gray & Pink wool scarf
    boticca.com
    Begun as a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • BECKSONDERGAARD Stole
    yoox.com
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    Composition: 50% Silk, 50% Wool. Details: plain weave, two-tone pattern, fringe. Measurements: Height: 44.46 inches Width: 74.88 inches.
  • Rosemary Goodenough 'Mad Red Flowers VII' Silk Twill Scarf
    boticca.com
    ‘Mad Red Flowers VII' is a perfect Silk Twill Scarf with an immaculate handrolled hem to frame it and it will be delivered to you in luxurious bespoke packaging. Made by one of the great Silk Printers near Lake Como in Italy, its name and the 'care' Information are discreetly printed onto the scarf so no need for an ugly sewn in label and it carries my signature logo in the bottom right hand corner. Because my scarves are asymmetric, they fold in many different ways unlike most scarf designs which are usually completely symmetrical. I do not sell seconds and only sell through authorised stockists so you know that it is an authentic Rosemary Goodenough piece. I offer free shipping worldwide and you will be asked to sign for it on receipt of delivery. A perfect present for yourself or someone you love!
  • futabaya Isekiku / Beige silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • Horse Wool Scarf in Alcazar design by Thomas Paul
    burkedecor.com
    This season thomaspaul looks to London for inspiration; specifically the London of the late 1960s and early 1970s. The patterns are a mixed lot - geometrics play off of sweet floral patterns, art nouveau sits next to art deco - and these are all interspersed with thomaspaul's signature animal motifs. It is all about mixing, matching, and layering patterns and colors. So feel free to embrace your inner English eccentric!. 100% merino wool. hand-screened. 28" x 80".
  • Forzieri Solid Pashmina & Silk Fringed Shawl
    forzieri.com
    This luscious and ultra-soft shawl by Forzieri is made in 70% Pashmina and 30% Silk for a sophisticated combination of precious materials to adorn your figure in a multitude of colors.
  • futabaya Isekiku / Blue silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
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