LUCIEN PELLAT FINET Print scarf - Lucien Pellat-Finet
  • futabaya Ribon / Gray silk scarf
    boticca.com
    "It Began as a fashion for the Samurai families. Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • futabaya FusekataHana / Gray & Pink wool scarf
    boticca.com
    Begun as a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • futabaya HanaKasa / Brown wool scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion that was started by the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed onto textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and more ostentatious colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • futabaya FusekataHana / Brown & Saxe wool scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon was first dyed onto textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and more ostentatious colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • futabaya CheckerCircle / Camel silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • Arlette Ess Seascape II
    boticca.com
    'Seascape II' features ink drawings of younger herring gulls which have speckled plumage, suspended before an abstract space defined by a hand-drawn perspective grid. The birds overwhelm the space and create an agitated web of interacting bodies, half obscuring the large black skeleton of the destroyed Brighton pier seen at an angle. The background is a black grid on a slate green colour, a colour the sea can take on a darker, overcast day. In size it is quite a bit bigger than the common 90x90cm size for silk squares. Depending on how it is worn this design breaks up into areas of monochrome speckled feathers, broken up by the slate green background. Often the visible seagull bits look like parts of wild animals, but together with the muted green it remains a subtle colour scheme which is not hard to combine with other colours or neutrals.
  • Burberry Shoes & Accessories Checked wool and silk-blend scarf
    net-a-porter.com
    Multicolored wool and silk-blend. 51% wool, 49% silk. Dry clean
  • LUCIEN PELLAT-FINET Cashmere Tartan Skull Scarf
    stylebop.com
    Add a touch of rock'n'roll attitude to cool weather looks with this super soft plaid skull scarf from Lucien Pellat-Finet. Blue/grey/black plaid cashmere with black skull print, black fringed ends. Easy to style length. Team with a biker jacket or classic cut pea coat. 100% Cashmere. Dry clean.
  • futabaya CheckerCircle / Blue silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
    • Marni Foulard-print cotton-twill scarf
    • OASIS Leopard Silk Square Scarf
    • Ladies Barbour silk georgette striped scarf in navy cream
    • LUCIEN PELLAT FINET Print scarf
    Collection
  • Saint Laurent Bandana printed cashmere and silk-blend scarf
    net-a-porter.com
    Red, white and black cashmere and silk-blend. 65% cashmere, 35% silk. Dry clean
  • union jack
    Styling idea
  • Lucien Pellat Finet Reversible Scarf
    farfetch.com
    Orange and blue cashmere reversible scarf from Lucien Pellat Finet featuring a plaid pattern, a skull pattern and fringe details.
  • futabaya Isekiku / Beige silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • Burberry Heritage Check Crinkled Cashmere Scarf
    burberry.com
    A gauze-weave crinkled cashmere scarf featuring the iconic check. The scarf is made in Scotland at a mill with a long heritage in producing cashmere. To create the distinctive texture, the cashmere is washed, then hand-twisted and knotted. Measuring 220 x 70cm/66.1 x 11.8in, the design is hand-finished with fringing.
  • Lucien Pellat Finet Cashmere Scarf
    farfetch.com
    Blue and black cashmere scarf from Lucien Pellat Finet featuring a plaid pattern, a skull pattern and fringe details.
  • futabaya Isekiku / Blue silk scarf
    boticca.com
    Originally a fashion amongst the Samurai families, Edo Komon began to be dyed on textiles during the Muromachi era. During the Edo era it was used for formal wear for the Samurai families, where each family had a unique pattern and could therefore be identified from the design of their kimono. Kimono for merchants was limited to pongee, cotton and hemp, and flashy colors were prohibited. It was acceptable to freely use brown and grey colors, and craftsmen in Edo expressed these two colors in various ways. The types of designs increased and various dye techniques were developed one after another. The Spirits of people who lived in Edo were expressed in dyed goods. Edo Komon's processes include preparation of paper patterns, engraving, dyeing, washing and finally steaming. We, Some-no-Sato Futaba-en have all of these craftsmen internally, to finish Edo Komon in one continuous operation.
  • Saint Laurent Polka-dot silk-georgette scarf
    net-a-porter.com
    Off-white and black silk-georgette. 100% silk. Dry clean
  • Malik brit show
    Styling idea
  • Lucien Pellat Finet Camouflage Scarf
    farfetch.com
    Light grey silk camouflage scarf from Lucien Pellat Finet featuring a skull pattern and finished edges.
  • Liberty London Cream Garden Gates Silk Twill Scarf
    liberty.co.uk
    Cream Garden Gates silk twill scarf from the Liberty London collection. A classic square silk scarf from Liberty is a timeless piece that will exude elegance for years to come. Features: Ornate blue and red Garden Gates print on a cream background. Finished edges. Composition: 100% Silk. Dimensions: 90cm x 90cm.
  • Burberry Prorsum Blue Flower Scarf
    ssense.com
    Cashmere scarf in green, yellow, blue and black. Bold flower pattern throughout. Frayed edges. Approx 66" x 26". 100% cashmere. Made in Italy.
  • Relax!
    Styling idea
  • Lucien Pellat Finet Camouflage Scarf
    farfetch.com
    Dark grey silk camouflage scarf from Lucien Pellat Finet featuring a skull pattern and finished edges.
  • Union Jack Tasseled Scarf
    yesstyle.com
    Brand from China: Cuteberry. Color: Beige, Materials: Cotton, Linen, Size: One Size: Length: 180cm / 70.9", Width: 110cm / 43.3", Care: Hand Wash
  • Alexander McQueen Black Romantic Skull Pashmina Scarf
    ssense.com
    Square semi-sheer pashmina scarf in black. Skull and flower graphics throughout off-white and pink. Fringed edge throughout. Approx. 52" x 52". 85% modal, 15% silk. Made in Italy.
  • Lucien Pellat Finet Cannabis Leaf Graphic Scarf
    farfetch.com
    Dark grey and blue merino wool blend scarf from Lucien Pellat-Finet featuring a single cannabis leaf graphic detail and finished edges. Measures 80" L x 20" W.
  • Gypsy 05 Women's Skeleton Scarf
    amazon.com
    Wrap scarf with original tie dye
  • Marni Two-Tone Fox Fur Stole
    modaoperandi.com
    Italian luxury at its finest is crafted in this lavish fox fur stole from Marni. Catering to all of your warmest needs, this pure Finland arctic fox fur stole is a classically elegant piece crafted in modern contemporary style. 100% artic fox fur from Finland. Lining: 50% acrylic, 50% wool. Padding: 100% polyester. Made in Italy.
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