Müller Möbelwerkstätten - Miniature Pile Bed
  • Charles and Ray Eames Vitra Miniatures Collection: Eames Stool C
    dwr.com
    Each handmade Vitra miniature is a classic in the history of furniture design reduced in size at a scale of 1:6. True to the original pieces in structure and, the miniatures are precision-crafted, making them a thoughtful gift for a furniture lover or design professional. Charles and Ray Eames received a commission to design the interiors of three lobbies in the new Time & Life Building at Rockefeller Center in New York City. In addition to outfitting these spaces, this major project encompassed the development of the comfortably upholstered Lobby Chairs and a group of stools made out of solid walnut. Inspired by an African stool that stood in the living room of the Eames House, the lathe-turned Eames Stools (1960), which were also conceived by Ray to be used as small occasional tables, have distinctive individual profiles. Each Vitra miniature comes handsomely packaged in a wood box with an informational booklet.
  • Charles and Ray Eames Vitra Miniatures Collection: Eames Stool B
    dwr.com
    Each handmade Vitra miniature is a classic in the history of furniture design reduced in size at a scale of 1:6. True to the original pieces in structure and, the miniatures are precision-crafted, making them a thoughtful gift for a furniture lover or design professional. Charles and Ray Eames received a commission to design the interiors of three lobbies in the new Time & Life Building at Rockefeller Center in New York City. In addition to outfitting these spaces, this major project encompassed the development of the comfortably upholstered Lobby Chairs and a group of stools made out of solid walnut. Inspired by an African stool that stood in the living room of the Eames House, the lathe-turned Eames Stools (1960), which were also conceived by Ray to be used as small occasional tables, have distinctive individual profiles. Each Vitra miniature comes handsomely packaged in a wood box with an informational booklet.
  • Charles and Ray Eames Vitra Miniatures Collection: Eames Stool A
    dwr.com
    Each handmade Vitra miniature is a classic in the history of furniture design reduced in size at a scale of 1:6. True to the original pieces in structure and, the miniatures are precision-crafted, making them a thoughtful gift for a furniture lover or design professional. Charles and Ray Eames received a commission to design the interiors of three lobbies in the new Time & Life Building at Rockefeller Center in New York City. In addition to outfitting these spaces, this major project encompassed the development of the comfortably upholstered Lobby Chairs and a group of stools made out of solid walnut. Inspired by an African stool that stood in the living room of the Eames House, the lathe-turned Eames Stools (1960), which were also conceived by Ray to be used as small occasional tables, have distinctive individual profiles. Each Vitra miniature comes handsomely packaged in a wood box with an informational booklet.
  • Vitra - Miniature Aarnio Ball Chair
    connox.com
    With its simple, striking shape and its bright colors Eero Aarnio's Ball Chair is a typical symbol of the optimistic, consumer-oriented popular culture of the 1960s. Equally apparent is an unconcealed enthusiasm for the technical which also typifies the era: Its exposed plastic which allowed even complex shapes to be produced in series relatively easily, at the time something completely new, and its dynamic shape, reminiscent of a space capsule. The idea of this kind of mobile capsule allowing people to sit where they want within the house also anticipates the kind of living concepts discussed in the 1970s for a young, liberal society. On the outside, this gleaming, polished sphere seems cold and futuristic, but its inside reveals a space where users can feel cozy and protected. From the inside outside noise is considerably muffled, allowing users to relax in any number of positions, for example, to sit cross-legged. Mounted on a round metal base just above ground level, the sphere can be completely rotated on its own axis, so that users can vary their view from the »cave«. Ball Chair thus represents a special category of household objects. It is something between a piece of furniture and a piece of architecture and at the same time embodies both the mobile and the established, the fixed. The original of the Aarnio Ball Chair was designed by Eero Aarnio in 1965 and it is produced as 1:1 model by Adelta, Dinslaken/Germany since 1990. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of fiberglass, aluminium and fabrics.
  • Vitra Eames Miniature Stools
    hivemodern.com
    Design Charles Eames, 1960. 1/6 miniature scale model. Made in Poland by Vitra. Each Vitra miniature is true to the original in construction and materials, and reduced in size on a scale of 1:6. Each miniature is packaged in a wooden box, accompanied by an informational booklet. Production notes: Each of the delicate objects are made by hand; on average, each miniature requires five hours of careful manual work. Ongoing quality control ensures that every miniature corresponds to its larger original in terms of finishing, details and materials. 2.5" h | 2.25" w | 2.25" d.
  • Vitra Miniature Wegner 3 Legged Chair
    hivemodern.com
    Design Hans Wegner, 1963. 1/6 miniature scale model. Made in Poland by Vitra. Each Vitra miniature is true to the original in construction and materials, and reduced in size on a scale of 1:6. Each miniature is packaged in a wooden box, accompanied by an informational booklet. Production notes: Each of the delicate objects are made by hand; on average, each miniature requires five hours of careful manual work. Ongoing quality control ensures that every miniature corresponds to its larger original in terms of finishing, details and materials. 4.75" h | 6" w | 5" d. Offered in red only.
  • Vitra Miniature La Mamma Chair
    hivemodern.com
    Design Pesce, 1969. 1/6 miniature scale model. Made in Poland by Vitra. Each Vitra miniature is true to the original in construction and materials, and reduced in size on a scale of 1:6. Each miniature is packaged in a wooden box, accompanied by an informational booklet. Production notes: Each of the delicate objects are made by hand; on average, each miniature requires five hours of careful manual work. Ongoing quality control ensures that every miniature corresponds to its larger original in terms of finishing, details and materials. 6" h | 7.5" w | 9" d.
  • Vitra - Miniature Thonet Chair No. 14
    connox.com
    The ”fourteen” is one of the most successful products of industrial serial-production of the world. It was the standard model out of the bentwood collection by Thonet and is considered as the typical Vienna coffee shop chair. More than 50 million specimens were already sold in 1930. The “fourteen” is kind of still in production, but in a slightly modified form. Michael Thonet developed the bentwood technique in which massive wood is bent inside of iron molds, becoming three dimensional with steam, meaning large designing liberty regarding the shape of wooden objects. For the 2nd half of the 18th century, Thonet’s new shipping system was also revolutionary: The single parts of the chairs were packed extremely space saving, sent to the place they were ordered from, and screwed together at just that place. The Thonet brothers were connected by industrial production and economic thinking in an independent aesthetic, decisively embossing the topic “industrial design”. The original of the chair No. 14 Was designed by Muchael Thonet in 1859/1860 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Gebr. Thonet, Vienna/ Gebr. Thonet, Frankenberg/ Thonet Industries Inc. Since 1865. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of dyed and lacquered beech wood.
  • Vitra - Miniature W1 Chair
    connox.com
    Dutch designer Mart Stam produced the first prototypes for a cantilevered chair in 1926, using sawed-off gas pipes which he linked with elbow butting. The base frame, legs, seat and back-rest were created by a continuous loop bent at right angles. In 1927 Stam had his design produced by the L. & C. Arnold company, which also featured it in their sales program for a year. Unlike the prototype, the Arnold chair was made from a single piece of tubular steel with a diameter of just 20 mm, and with walls 2 mm thick. The bends in the tube had to be reinforced with solid iron rods, and thus lacked any springiness. The chair was painted black or grey, and, with its covering of rubber or coarse fabric, had a rather unassuming appearance. The original of the W1 Chair has been designed by Mart Stam in 1926 and it is manufactured as 1:1 model by the brothers Thonet company in Frankenberg, Germany since 1932. The miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) offered in our shop, consists of lacquered steel tube and fabrics.
  • Vitra Miniature Eames Lounge + Ottoman
    hivemodern.com
    Design Charles & Ray Eames, 1956. 1/6 miniature scale model. Made in Poland by Vitra. Each Vitra miniature is true to the original in construction and materials, and reduced in size on a scale of 1:6. Each miniature is packaged in a wooden box, accompanied by an informational booklet. Production notes: Each of the delicate objects are made by hand; on average, each miniature requires five hours of careful manual work. Ongoing quality control ensures that every miniature corresponds to its larger original in terms of finishing, details and materials. 5.5" h | 5.5" w | 5.5" d.
  • Vitra - Miniature Saarinen Tulip Chair
    connox.com
    The Tulip Chair is one of a series of chairs, stools, and tables developed by Eero Saarinen within a five-year period. The characteristic feature of the series is that the supporting structure has been pared to a central supporting stem »like a wineglass« in order to emphasise the uniformity of table and chair. Eero Saarinen describes the Tulip Chair: »The bases of tables and chairs in a typical furniture arrangement create an ugly, confusing, and restless world. I wanted to design a chair as an integrated whole once again. All important furniture of the past always had a holistic structure, from King Tut’s chair to that of Thomas Chippendale. Today, we are parting ways with this holism with our predilection for plastic and laminated wood shells. I am looking forward to the point when the plastics industry will be capable of manufacturing the chair using just one material, the way I have designed it.« The original of the Saarinen Tulip Chair was designed by Eero Saarinen in 1956 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Knoll Associates Inc., New York/USA since 1956. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of lacquered polyurethane, aluminium and fabrics.
  • Vitra - Miniature Tom Vac Chair
    connox.com
    The Tom Vac Chair was first realized as one element in a sculpture consisting of 70 stacking chairs named »Totem«. Commissioned by the magazine Domus, it was set up in the centre of Milan during the Salone del Mobile in 1997. The seat shell with the characteristic wave profile is based on earlier versions Ron Arad sketched for the dining room of a house in Tel Aviv. The first small series for »Totem« was created in just four months. Though it is a complicated metal to manufacture, vacuum-formed aluminium proved to be a suitable material. In collaboration with furniture maker Vitra, for whom he had already produced the Well Tempered Chair back in 1986, Ron Arad developed, within a very short time, a version of the Tom Vac Chair suitable for mass production. Seen within the context of Arad’s complete work, which is largely characterized by »one offs«, the chair is something of an innovation by virtue of its industrial and by extension inexpensive production. While the design of the Tom Vac Chair only deviates minimally from the first plan, the flexible seat shell of polypropylene offers a high degree of comfort. The original of the Tom Vac Chair was designed by Ron Arad in 1999 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra AG, Basel/Switzerland, since 1999. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of synthetics and chromed iron-wire.
  • Vitra - Miniature Big Easy Chair
    connox.com
    In 1988 and 1989, Arad’s London »One Off« work shop created an entire series of »Big Easy« armchairs using bent sheet steel welded at the edges. The »Big Easys« were brought out as individual items or small limited series; they all had a striking basic form and inflated arms reminiscent of comics – but they differed in terms of the welding and color. In the course of time, the initially oarse, roughly welded »Big Easys« went through changes, first becoming colorful lacquered chairs with smooth surfaces and then elegant versions made of polished stainless steel. Although Ron Arad’s furniture are variants on everyday things, they seem strange and irritate the eye – not only owing to the choice of material. Formally and functionally speaking, they undermine customary assumptions. You feel you have to first learn how to use them. A »Big Easy’s« voluminous steel body of the »Big Easy« resembles a traditional upholstered club armchair but can hardly be associated with a sense of comfortable interiors. Ron Arad considered it an art object that could likewise be functional, but was not intended to be particularly practical. The original of the Big Easy Chair was designed by Ron Arad in 1988 and it is produced as 1:1 model by Vitra AG, Basel/Switzerland, since 1998. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of blackened stainless steel sheet metal.
  • Vitra - Miniature Eames Aluminium Chair
    connox.com
    The furniture making up the indoor-outdoor group goes back to an idea by Alexander Girard and Eero Saarinen, who were looking for furnishings to harmonize with the house they had just completed for Irvin Miller. Girard, one of whose interests as an architect was landscape gardening, complained that though there was a good choice of furniture for interiors, there was nothing to grace attractive patios – and no decent garden furniture. Charles Eames became preoccupied with this problem until one day during a flight he came up with the idea of an aluminium frame construction combined with a material »seat«. He wanted to develop a shape following the natural lines of the body, not however as a hard shell, but as a resilient length of material stretched between two supports which trace the body’s natural form. A narrow plastic strip extending the length of the material acts as reinforcement. The material is held in place by insertion into slits on the frame’s outer edge. Experiments with different covering materials later resulted in an upholstered sandwich construction consisting of two layers of »Nauga hide« with a thin filling of vinyl-foam and vinylwadding stitched at intervals of 1 7/8 inches using a high-frequency welding technique. Originally conceived for outside use, the first aluminium easy chairs to be mass produced, are today used solely in interiors. The original of the Eames Aluminium Chair was designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1958 and it is produced as 1:1 model by Herman Miller, Zeeland/Michigan/USA since 1958. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of polished cast aluminium and leather.
  • Vitra - Miniature La Chaise
    connox.com
    »La Chaise« was created as an entry for the »Low-Cost Furniture Design« competition held by the Museum of Modern Art in New York. »La Chaise« consists of two paper-thin fiberglass shells glued to each other but separated by hard rubber discs; the intervening space was filled with polystyrene foam. Charles and Ray Eames left the plastic shell un-treated. The base is made of five in part angled metal rods inserted into a cross-shaped wooden structure. The space left open between back and seat is not technically necessary, but instead purely a design element. The intention was to emphasize the chair’s light weight visually by perforating the otherwise large volume of the shell. The original of the La Chaise was designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1948 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra International AG, Basel/Switzerland since 1991. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of fiberglass, an iron rod and lacquered wood.
  • Vitra - Miniature B3 Wassily
    connox.com
    Marcel Breuer was one of the most important designers of the early modern age. His biography is closely linked to the history of the Bauhaus, founded by Walter Gropius in 1919. The club chair B3, known today as »Wassily« was also created in connection with this renowned institution. Lt is the first piece of seating furniture in the history of design to be made from seamless, precision-drawn tubular steel. Lts transparency and visible structure are expressions of the stringent aesthetic approach that prevailed in architecture and design following World War I. Marcel Breuer replaced the massive upholstered corpus of the traditional club chair with a skeleton-like construction made out of bent steel tubing, thereby overcoming the physical weightiness of conventional seating. He exploited the elasticity of the material, complementing it with tautly stretched fabric strips of reinforced canvas for the seat and back. The B3 did not acquire the name »Wassily« until the beginning of the sixties, when the Italian furniture producer Dino Gavina purchased the manufacturing rights: Marcel Breuer had designed the armchair for the house of the painter Wassily Kandinsky, who taught at the Bauhaus from 1922 until 1933. The original of the Wassily B3 was designed by Marcel Breuer in 1925 and it is produced as 1:1 model by The Knoll Group, New York/USA since 1968. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of nickel plated steel tube and black leather.
  • Vitra - Miniature Butterfly Stool
    connox.com
    As a student in the 1940s Sori Yanagi accompanied Charlotte Perriand on her trips through Japan, thus becoming familiar with the classical Moderns. It is possible that this is what aroused Yanagi's interest in seating, something which does not exist in Japanese culture. Even today a large number of Japanese households manage without any kind of seats, even in the cities, since it is traditional to sit on the floor on tatami mats. In view of the above Yanagi's Butterfly stool can be described as unusual on a number of counts. The designer adopts a familiar Western shape and combines it with a technique employed by Charles and Ray Eames which involves using bent plywood for industrial manufacture. The stool is unusually cleverly constructed, with two identical shapes connected axisymmetrically by means of two screws underneath the seat and a screwed on brass rod. This creates a shape reminiscent in some ways of the torii (gates) to Shinto shrines, which gives the stool an oriental look. At the same time it calls to mind the wings of a butterfly, hence its name. The stool was awarded the gold medal at the 1957 Milan triennial. The original of the Butterfly Chair was designed by Sori Yanagi in 1954 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra AG, Basel/Switzerland. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of bent plywood and brass.
  • Vitra - Miniature Eames LCM Chair
    connox.com
    Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen designed a chair in 1940 with a new type of three-dimensional pre-shaped plywood seat for a competition held by the New York Museum of Modern Art. The chair did not go into production owing to a lack of technical know-how. It was very rare back then for plywood to be successfully pressed into a three-dimensional shape. In the years that followed, Charles and Ray Eames concentrated on developing a process that enabled plywood to be shaped as they wanted. The »Plywood Chairs« DCW (Dining Chair Wood), LCW (Lounge Chair Wood) and the versions with metal legs, namely DCM (Dining Chair Metal) and LCM were the result of these years of experimentation. In 1945 Charles and Ray Eames again took up the idea of a seat made of formed plywood without, however, coming up with satisfactory solutions. As a consequence, they rejected the idea of a multifunctional seat and decided to treat seat and back as separate, freely articulated elements that were linked with each other via a backbone – the frame. Each component is therefore reduced to a clearly defined function which it fulfills with a minimum of materials being used. The rubber »shock mounts« glued onto the wood enable the seat and back to be connected to the frame. The original of the Eames LCM Chair was designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1945 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Herman Miller Furniture Company, Zeeland/Michigan/USA as well as the Vitra International AG, Basel/Switzerland since 1957. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of black plywood and nickel plated steel tube.
  • Vitra - Miniature Well Tempered Chair
    connox.com
    Ron Arad is one of the liveliest and most productive figures in contemporary designs. He contrasts polished, stylish commercial design with highly poetic objects with an archaic feel to them. In the framework of the »Vitra Edition« he created the »Well Tempered Chair«. Its form is not the product of artificially shaping the sheet steel but is instead generated by screwing the tensile sheets into arches. Given its flexibility, the spring steel always bounces back into its original shape. The armchair is therefore not just a brilliant formal idea but also conveys a completely new feel for sitting. The original of the Well Tempered Chair was designed by Ron Arad in 1986 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra AG, Basel/Switzerland, since 1986-1987. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of spring-steel.
  • Vitra - Miniature Marshmallow Sofa
    connox.com
    George Nelson is one of the most influential personalities in U.S. Design after 1945. As of 1946 he was for many years head of the Design Department at the Herman Miller company, on whose behalf he engaged designers hardly known at the time, such as Charles Eames , Isamu Noguchi, and Alexander Girard. And he was also inspired by other areas of culture: Along with his work as an architect, he concerned himself with ongoing sociological and artistic themes. Nelson’s ”Marshmallow”-sofa must be considered one of the earliest "Pop Art" furniture designs: The transformation of a traditional sofa into a threedimensional structure made of soft, colored cushioning. The seat and back are supported by a steel construction and the unit has the shape of an axially symmetrical folded-out waffle. The original of the Marshmallow Sofa was designed by George Nelson in 1956 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Herman Miller Furniture Company, Zeeland/Michigan/USA and the Vitra International AG, Basel/Switzerland since 1956. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of lacquered steel tube, aluminium and leather cushions.
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  • Vitra - Miniature Eames DKR Wire Chair
    connox.com
    Charles and Ray Eames developed this model in connection with the »Low Cost Furniture« competition held by the Museum of Modern Art in New York and for the Herman Miller company, who produced various versions of the chair between 1951 and 1967. As with their plastic chairs, the seats and backs are again modeled on the human body. In the case of DKR, however, the result is a comfortable organic form even though such a hard and cold material as steel wire is used. Manufactured on an industrial scale, it proved possible to sell the chair successfully at a relatively low price. In 1952, the design won the Trail Blazer Award given by the Home Fashions League in the United States. The original of the Eames DKR Wire Chair was designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1950 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra International AG, Basel/Switzerland since 1991. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of chromed iron-wire and an “Eifel-Tower” base.
  • Vitra - Miniature Coconut Chair
    connox.com
    In contrast to the trend of adapting sitting furniture to the requirements of the human body, George Nelson designs sitting objects from the formal repertoire of spontaneous, popular everyday culture. The shapes he used were strongly stimulated by the art of the 1950s. His symbolic statements promoted a new, very casual form of sitting. Nelson’s Coconut Chair was inspired by the coconut shell. The seat consists of a glass-fibre reinforced plastic shell with upholstery. The three-legged base of tubular steel is stabilized using fine crossbars. One has the impression that the frame spans the floating, swinging form taut and fixes it to the floor. The original of the Coconut Chair was designed by George Nelson in 1955 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra AG, Basel/Switzerland since 1988. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of polished aluminium, steel sheet, foam and leather.