Nambe Scoop Server - Nambé
  • Nambe Scoop Server
    macys.com
    Similar item
    Over-the-top stunning. Two metal bowls connected by a graceful arc make whatever you put in the Scoop server a guaranteed crowd pleaser. A clever gift for modern couples and innovative way to serve pita and hummus or chips with onion dip. By Wei Young for Nambe's collection of serveware and serving dishes. Metal alloy.
  • Nambe Scoop Server 2-Tier Bowl
    lampsplus.com
    This distinctive bowl makes party service a snap. Fill the bottom bowl with chips or veggies and the top vessel with salsa or guacamole, or any other gastronomic combination. Made from Nambe's signature metal alloy, this bowl is easy to clean and care for. When the party is over, fill the bottom of the bowl with polished rocks and the top with a glowing tealight. A smart design from Nambe. Nambe alloy metal serving bowl. 2-tier service. 11" wide. 8" high.
  • Herbert Krenchel Large Krenit Bowls, Set of 3
    dwr.com
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark. Set includes Medium Red, Large Turquoise and Extra-Large Black Krenit Bowls.
  • Crate & Barrel Pumpkin Large Server
    crateandbarrel.com
    The time-honored practice of incorporating vegetable shapes into serving pieces is re-imagined in Barbara Eigen's whimsical yet elegant design. For this nature-inspired bowl, she takes the ridged surface, familiar round form and expressive stem of a pumpkin to form a lidded bowl. Each vessel is cast using traditional techniques and given a rich matte white glaze. Food-safe bowl makes for enlightened entertaining as well as inspired decorating as a prized collectible.
  • Carl Mertens Verso Peanut Server
    shophorne.com
    Serving peanuts and other small snacks usually involves having to dig five fingers into a bowl. Mario Taepper of MM Design Edition envisioned VERSO, part scooper, part serving vessel which is ultimately a more elegant and hygenic way to serve nuts. Manfactured by Carl Mertens of Germany of 18/10 mirror polished stainless steel; dishwasher safe.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Extra-Large
    dwr.com
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
  • Nambe Clam Chip and Dip Bowl
    macys.com
    Your guests will be in awe of your hors d'oerves when you serve them in this beautiful acacia wood clam chip and dip bowl from Nambe. The removable dip bowl can be chilled, warmed, or passed separately. Perfect for dinner parties, Bbq's, or game day.
  • Crate & Barrel Pumpkin Medium Server
    crateandbarrel.com
    The time-honored practice of incorporating vegetable shapes into serving pieces is re-imagined in Barbara Eigen's whimsical yet elegant design. For this nature-inspired bowl, she takes the ridged surface, familiar round form and expressive stem of a pumpkin to form a lidded bowl. Each vessel is cast using traditional techniques and given a rich matte white glaze. Food-safe bowl makes for enlightened entertaining as well as inspired decorating as a prized collectible.
  • Nambe Venus Serving Bowl
    macys.com
    People also liked
    This gorgeous Nambe serving bowl by award-winning designer Wei Young boasts stunning curves reminiscent of ocean waves. Perfect for salads and stews, this piece can be heated or chilled for endless entertaining options.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Large
    dwr.com
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
  • Nambe Venus Seafood Platter
    macys.com
    Present oysters, crab cakes or other sea specialities to your guest in stunning style. This stainless steel platter from Nambe is a versatile piece with a classic design and strong structure.
  • Nambé Butterfly Chip & Dip
    bloomingdales.com
    Bring a rustic yet refined element to entertaining with Nambé's Butterfly Chip and Dip. It's crafted of naturally durable, stain-resistant acacia wood with an artfully variegated grain that warmly contrasts a silvery dip bowl formed of Nambe's signature tarnish-resistant metal. Nambé alloy/acacia wood. Hand wash; polish bowl. Imported. 16" Platter; 5.5" bowl. Designed by Sean O'Hara.
  • Nambe Christmas Tidbit Snowman Bowl
    macys.com
    Crafted from solid alloy and designed by award-winning artist Alvaro Uribe, this Nambe snowman bowl serves up holiday cheer in sparkling style. Use it to hold Christmas candies or to serve sugar packets alongside after-dinner coffee.
  • Herbert Krenchel Small Krenit Bowls, Set of 3
    dwr.com
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark. Set includes Extra-Small Orange, Small Light Blue and Medium White Krenit Bowls.
  • Nambé Stinger Honey Pot
    bloomingdales.com
    Equal parts sculptural and playful, Nambé's Stinger Honey Pot makes it easy to drizzle the perfect amount of honey over tea, toast and desserts. Aluminum/enamel. Hand wash. Imported. 3" D x 8" H: holds 8 oz.
  • Crate & Barrel Squash Small Server
    crateandbarrel.com
    The time-honored practice of incorporating vegetable shapes into serving pieces is re-imagined in Barbara Eigen's whimsical yet elegant design. For this nature-inspired bowl, she takes the ribbed surface and curvaceous form of a squash to form a lidded bowl. Each stoneware vessel is cast using traditional techniques and given a rich matte white glaze. Food-safe bowl makes for enlightened entertaining as well as inspired decorating as a prized collectible.
  • Nambé Evo Bowl with Spoon
    bloomingdales.com
    This decidedly modern bowl by Nambé makes lends artful presentation to cocktail sauce, hummuse, tapenades and more. Aluminum/enamel. Hand wash. Imported. 5.5" X 5" x 4.75" H.
  • Crate & Barrel Patty Pan Squash Small Server
    crateandbarrel.com
    The time-honored practice of incorporating vegetable shapes into serving pieces is re-imagined in Barbara Eigen's whimsical yet elegant design. For this nature-inspired bowl, she takes the intriguing squat shape and ridged of a patty pan squash to form a lidded serving piece. Each stoneware vessel is cast using traditional techniques and given a rich matte white glaze. Food-safe bowl makes for enlightened entertaining as well as inspired decorating as a prized collectible.
  • Nambe Fruit Tree Bowl
    allmodern.com
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    The Fruit Tree Bowl adds a delicious sense of fun and jubilation to the kitchen or dining room. Fill the bowl with seasonal produce, and drape bananas or grapes over the Nambe alloy fingers for a celebration of wholesome goodness. The rich, natural wood tones make the fruit colors pop, and the upward gesture of the fingers and of the shape of the bowl itself give this unique piece an irresistibly playful spirit. Designed by: Wei Young, 2011 Features: Material: Namb Alloy and acacia wood. Use wooden or soft rubber utensils to avoid scratches. Remove dust and fingerprints with a soft, damp cloth. Never put Namb Alloy pieces in the microwave. Do not put Namb Alloy in the dishwasher or leave in standing water for long periods of time.
  • Nambe 9" Tri-Corner Bowl
    macys.com
    Tabletop sculpture. Cast by the craftspeople of Nambe, this 9"/ 2qt. tri-corner bowl passes through the hands of 15 artisans from start to finish. Although the sculptural shape and high polish are distinctly Nambe, the manufacturing process makes each bowl unique. Individually hand-crafted in Santa Fe, New Mexico. (Coordinating set of servers sold separately.) Metal.
  • Nambé Braid Collection Serving Tray
    bloomingdales.com
    Artful coils formed of brightly gleaming chrome decorate this sculptural serving piece from Nambé. Richly grained acacia wood lends earthy warmth. Acacia wood/chrome plate. Hand wash. Imported. 19” L. X 14” W. X 2” H.
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Medium
    dwr.com
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
  • Nambe Gourmet Harmony Chip and Dip
    macys.com
    Entertain with ease. Perfectly blending smooth wood with lustrous stainless steel, the Harmony chip and dip takes hosting to new heights of style. Designed by Wei Young for Nambe.
  • Hammersmith Jewels Smokey Quartz Round Bowl
    mikasa.com
    This Towle Smokey Quartz Round Bowl features graceful curves accented with intriguing hammering on the exterior, and a burst of translucent "jewel" colored enamel on the interior. This bowl is ideal for serving your guests everything from mashed potatoes to pasta to fruit salad. Makes a great home decor accent, as well. Crafted of food-safe alternative metal alloy, this bowl will not scratch or dent under normal use and never requires polishing. Oven safe for warming food and freezer safe. Hand wash with mild soap and dry with a soft cloth. Smokey quartz round bowl measures 11 inch diameter x 5 inch high.
  • Nambé Braid Collection Small Serving Bowl
    bloomingdales.com
    A delicate braid pattern traces the rim of this lustrous metal serving piece from Nambé. Nambé alloy. Hand wash. Imported. 8" x 7.25"
  • Herbert Krenchel Krenit Bowl, Small
    dwr.com
    “I am excited about shapes and structures,” says Danish designer Herbert Krenchel. “The surface on a design object is important because it makes people want to reach out for it.” His hand-finished Krenit Bowl (1950s), with a bold colored interior that pops against a matte black exterior, serves as an inviting vessel for all sorts of items. Its utility and form are purposeful: “I also believe that there has to be a balance between function and aesthetics,” continues Krenchel. “A good design must therefore contain more than one aspect to make the perfect overall impression.” Krenchel’s now-iconic Krenit (a combination of his name and Eternit, the name of a fiber cement he used in his work) was the recipient of the gold medal at the 1954 Milan Triennial. Introduced in the early ’50s, the bowl was produced until 1966 and reintroduced by Normann Copenhagen in 2008. The Danish design company has stayed true to Krenchel’s specifications, finishing each piece by hand, but has updated the interior material from hard-to-maintain enamel to durable and lightweight melamine. The food-safe Krenit maintains its steel exterior – it was conceptualized before the advent of microwaves, after all – so be sure not to nuke it. Not dishwasher safe or for use with steel utensils. Clean by hand with warm water, then wipe thoroughly. We recommend oiling the edges regularly to prevent rust. Made in Denmark.
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