notNeutral - City Plate: Mexico City
  • notNeutral City Plate - Mexico City
    notneutral.com
    Part of our fourth collection of City Plates. The theme for this fourth collection is Empire Building. The theme for this fourth collection is Empire Building and takes a look at the global impact of Empires on settlement patterns, national borders, cultural identity, and modern city form. These four ancient cities are compared at their height with their modern cityscapes today. Mexico City - pop. 19.6 million. The first incarnation of Mexico City was as Tenochtitlan during the Aztec Empire. The historic core, the area in white in the center of the plate, is inspired by Aztec city planning and overlaps the Baroque city planning that was brought to the Americas by the Spanish. Spanish colonialists expanded their empire though conquests in the Americas and brought an entirely new form of architecture to Mexico City. This is seen in the very Baroque designs along Paseo de la Reforma (in green) which tells of the city’s transformation along its central extension. The great Chapultepec Park (in green) at the one end houses both the Natural History Museum and the National Anthropology Museum (both in red) stand in congruence with the great urban respite farther down the Paseo de la Reforma, the Alameda Central (in green). On the other side of that, the Zocalo ends this central corridor. These porcelain plates measure 12” across, with each city’s downtown core printed on a black background. Key buildings are represented with persimmon icons, while rivers and public spaces are shown in blue and green. Each plate is boxed and includes a key to the buildings and spaces included on the plate. 12" diameter. Dishwasher safe. Boxed with Printed Key.
  • notNeutral City On A Plate: Paris
    allmodern.com
    The original City Plate was a commemorative platter in honor of the 2006 AIA Convention, which was hosted by Los Angeles. The notNeutral parent firm, the Rios Clementi Hale Studios, had been working on a series of diagrams for their Civic Park project in downtown Los Angeles, looking at elements such as open space, circulation, and land use in the downtown core relative to the urban context of greater Los Angeles. A draft of the plan was up on one the common walls in the studio that notNeutral and the Rios Clementi Hale Studios share, and, typical of the cross-disciplinary interplay, notNeutral had the inspiration to translate the diagram onto a ceramic plate. The reductive graphics of the diagram and the recognizable pattern of LA streets and landmarks translated well to the medium. The response to the plate at the Convention was very enthusiastic ('Do my city!'), and the notNeutral expanded the idea into a series of plates. The result was a line of City Plates, released in series of four, which look at cities as a graphic language of line, color, and pattern as a means to investigate the cultural, economic, historical, and political impacts on city form. Each series has a particular conceptual framework that relates the four cities to each other, and the series as a whole operates within an ecological matrix organized by patterns of urban development: organic, baroque, gridded, and eclectic. The idea was that as the series evolved, the City Plates would form a network of relationships to each other that would allow people to design their own combination of plates (American cities, Coastal cities, Colonial cities, for example) that would allow interesting comparisons. This methodology led the notNeutral to some of the great cities of the world, and also to some less well-known cities that warrant attention. Each plate celebrates the beauty implicit in a city's unique form, a distinct pattern that has evolved over time as layers of history are inscribed into the urban landscape. Paris has hosted more World's Fairs than any other city, the most architecturally memorable one occurring in 1889 and symbolized by the Eiffel Tower, which was built for the event. The Eiffel Tower and other landmarks including L'Arc du Triomphe, the Opera Bastille and former marketplace and Paris' new urban railway hub, Les Halles are noted in red on this plate. The Paris plate is bisected by the Seine in blue with the Jardin de Tuileries (in green) and the Louvre (in red) marking the center of the plate. Features: Plate. City On A Plate collection. Material: Porcelain. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Individually boxed with a printed key (map) Designed in Los Angeles. Dimensions: 12" W x 12" D, 2.2 lbs.
  • notNeutral City On A Plate: Chicago
    allmodern.com
    The original City Plate was a commemorative platter in honor of the 2006 AIA Convention, which was hosted by Los Angeles. The notNeutral parent firm, the Rios Clementi Hale Studios, had been working on a series of diagrams for their Civic Park project in downtown Los Angeles, looking at elements such as open space, circulation, and land use in the downtown core relative to the urban context of greater Los Angeles. A draft of the plan was up on one the common walls in the studio that notNeutral and the Rios Clementi Hale Studios share, and, typical of the cross-disciplinary interplay, notNeutral had the inspiration to translate the diagram onto a ceramic plate. The reductive graphics of the diagram and the recognizable pattern of LA streets and landmarks translated well to the medium. The response to the plate at the Convention was very enthusiastic ('Do my city!'), and the notNeutral expanded the idea into a series of plates. The result was a line of City Plates, released in series of four, which look at cities as a graphic language of line, color, and pattern as a means to investigate the cultural, economic, historical, and political impacts on city form. Each series has a particular conceptual framework that relates the four cities to each other, and the series as a whole operates within an ecological matrix organized by patterns of urban development: organic, baroque, gridded, and eclectic. The idea was that as the series evolved, the City Plates would form a network of relationships to each other that would allow people to design their own combination of plates (American cities, Coastal cities, Colonial cities, for example) that would allow interesting comparisons. This methodology led notNeutral to some of the great cities of the world, and also to some less well-known cities that warrant attention. Each plate celebrates the beauty implicit in a city's unique form, a distinct pattern that has evolved over time as layers of history are inscribed into the urban landscape. The Columbian Exposition was more than just a World's Fair: it inspired a sense of wonder and put Chicago on the cultural map. It also served to show the world that the city had risen from the ashes of the Great Chicago Fire, which had destroyed much of the city in 1871. The city has since became a breeding ground for great architecture. With a progressive mayor that has championed sustainable practices and subsidized 'green' projects during his tenure, Chicago continues to embrace innovation. Features: Plate. City On A Plate collection. Material: Porcelain. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Individually boxed with a printed key (map) Designed in Los Angeles. Dimensions: 12" W x 12" D, 2.2 lbs.
  • notNeutral City On A Plate: Montreal
    allmodern.com
    The original City Plate was a commemorative platter in honor of the 2006 AIA Convention, which was hosted by Los Angeles. The notNeutral parent firm, the Rios Clementi Hale Studios, had been working on a series of diagrams for their Civic Park project in downtown Los Angeles, looking at elements such as open space, circulation, and land use in the downtown core relative to the urban context of greater Los Angeles. A draft of the plan was up on one the common walls in the studio that notNeutral and the Rios Clementi Hale Studios share, and, typical of the cross-disciplinary interplay, notNeutral had the inspiration to translate the diagram onto a ceramic plate. The reductive graphics of the diagram and the recognizable pattern of LA streets and landmarks translated well to the medium. The response to the plate at the Convention was very enthusiastic ('Do my city!'), and the notNeutral expanded the idea into a series of plates. The result was a line of City Plates, released in series of four, which look at cities as a graphic language of line, color, and pattern as a means to investigate the cultural, economic, historical, and political impacts on city form. Each series has a particular conceptual framework that relates the four cities to each other, and the series as a whole operates within an ecological matrix organized by patterns of urban development: organic, baroque, gridded, and eclectic. The idea was that as the series evolved, the City Plates would form a network of relationships to each other that would allow people to design their own combination of plates (American cities, Coastal cities, Colonial cities, for example) that would allow interesting comparisons. This methodology led the notNeutral to some of the great cities of the world, and also to some less well-known cities that warrant attention. Each plate celebrates the beauty implicit in a city's unique form, a distinct pattern that has evolved over time as layers of history are inscribed into the urban landscape. Expo 67, considered to be the most successful World's Fair of the 20th century, was organized along the theme of 'Man and his World,' and meant to characterize the liberation and openness of the period. One of the seventeen elements of the theme (which included 'Man the Creator' and 'Man the Producer') was Habitat 67, a landmark housing development designed by Moshe Safdie. The project was intended to introduce innovations in affordable housing through the use of modular units with private gardens (a precursor of the prefab housing now in fashion). Habitat 67 is noted (in red) along the Saint Lawrence River (in blue). Other notable city features in the plate include the immense Parc du Mont-Royal (in green) and many of Montreal's world class museums including the Mussee des Beaux Arts, McCord Museum and the Mussee d'Art Contemporain de Montreal. Features: Plate. City On A Plate collection. Material: Porcelain. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Individually boxed with a printed key (map) Designed in Los Angeles. Dimensions: 12" W x 12" D, 2.2 lbs.
  • notNeutral City On A Plate: Boston
    allmodern.com
    The original City Plate was a commemorative platter in honor of the 2006 AIA Convention, which was hosted by Los Angeles. The notNeutral parent firm, the Rios Clementi Hale Studios, had been working on a series of diagrams for their Civic Park project in downtown Los Angeles, looking at elements such as open space, circulation, and land use in the downtown core relative to the urban context of greater Los Angeles. A draft of the plan was up on one the common walls in the studio that notNeutral and the Rios Clementi Hale Studios share, and, typical of the cross-disciplinary interplay, notNeutral had the inspiration to translate the diagram onto a ceramic plate. The reductive graphics of the diagram and the recognizable pattern of LA streets and landmarks translated well to the medium. The response to the plate at the Convention was very enthusiastic ('Do my city!'), and the notNeutral expanded the idea into a series of plates. The result was a line of City Plates, released in series of four, which look at cities as a graphic language of line, color, and pattern as a means to investigate the cultural, economic, historical, and political impacts on city form. Each series has a particular conceptual framework that relates the four cities to each other, and the series as a whole operates within an ecological matrix organized by patterns of urban development: organic, baroque, gridded, and eclectic. The idea was that as the series evolved, the City Plates would form a network of relationships to each other that would allow people to design their own combination of plates (American cities, Coastal cities, Colonial cities, for example) that would allow interesting comparisons. This methodology led the notNeutral to some of the great cities of the world, and also to some less well-known cities that warrant attention. Each plate celebrates the beauty implicit in a city's unique form, a distinct pattern that has evolved over time as layers of history are inscribed into the urban landscape. One of the oldest cities in the United States, Boston was founded by Puritan colonists escaping religious persecution. It is a city established upon the spirit of independence, the same spirit which led the city's citizens to play a prominent role in the American Revolution. Many of the sites relating to this period are included along the Freedom Trail, delineated on the plate by a red dashed line. The city is also the site of pivotal firsts, including the country's first public school and subway system. Features: Plate. City On A Plate collection. Material: Porcelain. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Individually boxed with a printed key (map) Designed in Los Angeles. Dimensions: 12" W x 12" D, 2.2 lbs.
  • Marimekko Oiva White/Green/Yellow Plate - 20cm dia.
    amara.com
    Marimekko – iconic Finnish design. Material: vitreous porcelain. Dimensions: Dia20cm. Beautiful yellow & green watercolour design. Part of the Weather Diary Collection. Inspired by weather patterns & autumnal hues. Matching Oiva tableware also available. Ideal for everyday dining & special occasions. Mix & match with complementing Marimekko dinnerware. Dishwasher & microwave safe. More Marimekko home accessories available.
  • C. Wonder Citrus Fruit Melamine Dinner Plate
    cwonder.com
    When life gives you lemons, use them as dinnerware! Dressed in a not-so-mellow yellow citrus print, this dinner plate in durable melamine is a shoo-in for summertime soirées in the garden and intimate picnics on the beach with your main, ahem, squeeze. For optimum juiciness, mix and match with other pieces from our citrus fruit tabletop collection. Melamine. 11" diameter. Microwave use not recommended. Dishwasher safe; top shelf only. Imported.
  • notNeutral In-The-Mix 20 Piece Dinnerware Set
    allmodern.com
    In-The-Mix: The ultimate casual china mix-and-match pattern! Four place settings, one of each pattern: Links, Letters, Flora and Ribbon. notNeutral has coordinated the dishes for you. Keep one pattern at each place setting or mix them up to keep your guests guessing! Features: Set includes four (4) dinner plates, four (4) rim bowls, four (4) small plates, four (4) cups, and four (4) saucers. In-The-Mix collection. Material: Porcelain. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Oven to table. Designed in Los Angeles. Dimensions: Product weight: 20.4 lbs.
  • Christopher Jagmin Even Numbered Poco Plates, Set of 4
    purehome.com
    It’s Fiesta Time for Two or Four! Bring Spanish fiesta style to your décor, with these “dos, cuatro, seis, ocho” printed plates. Reading even-numbered Spanish words for eclectic decoration, the Poco plates show off the quirks of your confident style. Perfect for entertaining, serving, or snacking, the smooth black and white printed dishes add a touch of transitional style to update your décor. When paired with the Odd Numbered Poco Plates, this set finishes your décor with a lively, fun flourish. Crafted from porcelain. Dishwasher safe and microwaveable. Set of four (4) plates. Matches the Odd Numbered Poco Plates. Made in Japan and the USA.
    • Noritake® Colorwave Graphite 8.25-Inch Floral Accent Plate
    • Christian Lacroix Forum Torre Dessert Plate
    • GILES Giles illustration Leah plate
    • notNeutral Black Letters Small Plate Set of 4
    Collection
  • Dena Home Marrakesh Salad Plate, Set of 4
    casa.com
    Dena Home Marrakesh Salad Plate, Set of 4. Marrakesh is hand crafted and designed by Dena Home. This collection features a unique Ikat (a weaving style in which fibers are tie-dyed before weaving) look pattern with a multicolor floral motif over a milky white background. Inspired by the colors of spring, master designer Dena Fishbein' s intent was to bring the freshness of a new season to the tabletop. This ware is fashioned from high fired, durable, porcelain to insure long term use and a lifetime of service. Perfect for everyday, the collection is dishwasher and microwave safe for easy care. Ideal for more formal occasional as well, Marrakesh can be "dressed up" by accessorizing with more formal stemware, flatware and table linens. Popular rim style is the perfect "canvas" for this, go anywhere yet neutral, design. The setting works perfectly when coordinated with the contrasting patterned dinner plate. The decoration is applied using specially formulated decorating decals that will look as good after years of use as they do when new. This functional plate can be used as a traditional salads plate or use for desserts, sandwiches and side dishes.
  • notNeutral In-The-Mix Dinner Plate (Set of 4)
    allmodern.com
    In-The-Mix: The ultimate mix-and-match pattern! Four pieces, one of each pattern: Links, Letters, Flora and Ribbon. Modern, bold and fun, you can use these pieces with your existing white dinnerware...or buy this set in multiples for your next buffet dinner party. Features: Plate. In-The-Mix collection. Material: Porcelain. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Oven to table. Designed in Los Angeles. Dimensions: 2.75" H x 11" W x 11" D, 7 lbs.
  • Kate Spade Japanese Floral Dinner Plate
    amara.com
    Kate Spade – global luxury lifestyle brand. Material: 100% porcelain. Diameter: 11.25" Beautifully crafted plate. Detailed with a thick black rim. Dishwasher & microwave safe. Perfect luxury gift idea. More luxury homeware from Kate Spade is available.
  • C. Wonder Citrus Fruit Melamine Dinner Plate
    cwonder.com
    Pretty in pink. Dressed up in a luscious grapefruit print, this dinner plate in durable melamine is a shoo-in for summertime soirées in the garden and intimate picnics on the beach with your main, ahem, squeeze. For optimum juiciness, mix and match with other pieces from our citrus fruit tabletop collection. Melamine. 11" diameter. Microwave use not recommended. Dishwasher-safe; top shelf only. Imported.
  • notNeutral Letters Small Plate (Set of 4)
    allmodern.com
    The Letters pattern was derived from deconstructed letter forms based on the font Clarendon. notNeutral turned the letters bold and enlarged them took parts of the outlined forms, added the dots, and overlapped them to form a continuous pattern. Features: Plate. Letters collection. Material: Porcelain. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Oven to table. Designed in Los Angeles. Dimensions: 2.5" H x 8.5" W x 8.5" D, 3.95 lbs.
  • DwellStudio Marais Platinum Tidbit Plates (Set Of 4)
    dwellstudio.com
    Showcasing a beautifully crafted design infused with artisanal flair, this captivating essential offers understated elegance for your dining room décor. Product: Set of 4 plates. Construction Material: Porcelain. Finish: Platinum glaze. Features: Great addition to any kitchen. Dimensions: 5.25" Diameter each. Cleaning and Care: Hand wash.
  • C. Wonder Citrus Fruit Melamine Salad Plate
    cwonder.com
    When the cocktail garnish meets the cupboard. Dressed in a zesty and vibrant lime print, this salad plate in durable melamine is a shoo-in for summertime soirées in the garden and intimate picnics on the beach with your main, ahem, squeeze. For optimum juiciness, mix and match with other pieces from our citrus fruit tabletop collection. Melamine. 9" diameter. Microwave use not recommended. Dishwasher safe; top shelf only. Imported.
  • notNeutral City On A Plate: Hollywood
    allmodern.com
    The original City Plate was a commemorative platter in honor of the 2006 AIA Convention, which was hosted by Los Angeles. The notNeutral parent firm, the Rios Clementi Hale Studios, had been working on a series of diagrams for their Civic Park project in downtown Los Angeles, looking at elements such as open space, circulation, and land use in the downtown core relative to the urban context of greater Los Angeles. A draft of the plan was up on one the common walls in the studio that notNeutral and the Rios Clementi Hale Studios share, and, typical of the cross-disciplinary interplay, notNeutral had the inspiration to translate the diagram onto a ceramic plate. The reductive graphics of the diagram and the recognizable pattern of LA streets and landmarks translated well to the medium. The response to the plate at the Convention was very enthusiastic ('Do my city!'), and the notNeutral expanded the idea into a series of plates. The result was a line of City Plates, released in series of four, which look at cities as a graphic language of line, color, and pattern as a means to investigate the cultural, economic, historical, and political impacts on city form. Each series has a particular conceptual framework that relates the four cities to each other, and the series as a whole operates within an ecological matrix organized by patterns of urban development: organic, baroque, gridded, and eclectic. The idea was that as the series evolved, the City Plates would form a network of relationships to each other that would allow people to design their own combination of plates (American cities, Coastal cities, Colonial cities, for example) that would allow interesting comparisons. This methodology led the notNeutral to some of the great cities of the world, and also to some less well-known cities that warrant attention. Each plate celebrates the beauty implicit in a city's unique form, a distinct pattern that has evolved over time as layers of history are inscribed into the urban landscape. From its inception, Hollywood has projected the image of itself as a place where anything can happen. As a district within the city of Los Angeles, Hollywood encompasses a reservoir, canyons, a municipal park, a freeway, expansive commercial boulevards, quiet residential communities and massive studio lots. This plate illustrates the idiosyncrasies of the region where all things aspirational and gaudy, natural and artificial, converge. The Hollywood Walk of Fame is highlighted with a red dashed line. To the east is a green dashed outline over a portion of the 101 Freeway, indicating the future site of the Hollywood Central Park. Features: Plate. City On A Plate collection. Material: Porcelain. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Individually boxed with a printed key (map) Designed in Los Angeles. Dimensions: 12" W x 12" D, 2.2 lbs.
  • Simon Pearce Royalton Salad Plate Scalloped
    didriks.com
    The Royalton Scalloped salad plate is characterized by a delicate, graceful edging reminiscent of fine lace. Each of these plates is individually handcrafted by Simon Pearce's master artisans, using a combination of traditional throwing techniques and new methods to ensure that every plate is one-of-a-kind. The pieces are then hand-finished with Simon Pearce's signature dove glaze. The Royalton scalloped salad plate measures 8-1/2 inches in diameter.
  • Scalamandre by Lenox® Zebras 3-Ounce Demitasse Cup & 5-Inch Saucer
    bedbathandbeyond.com
    This fine bone china dinnerware features Scalamandre's iconic zebra designs which stand out in bold black and white against dramatic red details. Rimmed in gold, it brings decorator inspired art to your table. Contemporary dinnerware features Scalamandre's iconic zebra designs. Rimmed in gold. Bone china. Dishwasher safe. Made in USA.
  • Brunch
    Styling idea
  • notNeutral City On A Plate: Palm Springs
    allmodern.com
    The original City Plate was a commemorative platter in honor of the 2006 AIA Convention, which was hosted by Los Angeles. The notNeutral parent firm, the Rios Clementi Hale Studios, had been working on a series of diagrams for their Civic Park project in downtown Los Angeles, looking at elements such as open space, circulation, and land use in the downtown core relative to the urban context of greater Los Angeles. A draft of the plan was up on one the common walls in the studio that notNeutral and the Rios Clementi Hale Studios share, and, typical of the cross-disciplinary interplay, notNeutral had the inspiration to translate the diagram onto a ceramic plate. The reductive graphics of the diagram and the recognizable pattern of LA streets and landmarks translated well to the medium. The response to the plate at the Convention was very enthusiastic ('Do my city!'), and the notNeutral expanded the idea into a series of plates. The result was a line of City Plates, released in series of four, which look at cities as a graphic language of line, color, and pattern as a means to investigate the cultural, economic, historical, and political impacts on city form. Each series has a particular conceptual framework that relates the four cities to each other, and the series as a whole operates within an ecological matrix organized by patterns of urban development: organic, baroque, gridded, and eclectic. The idea was that as the series evolved, the City Plates would form a network of relationships to each other that would allow people to design their own combination of plates (American cities, Coastal cities, Colonial cities, for example) that would allow interesting comparisons. This methodology led the notNeutral to some of the great cities of the world, and also to some less well-known cities that warrant attention. Each plate celebrates the beauty implicit in a city's unique form, a distinct pattern that has evolved over time as layers of history are inscribed into the urban landscape. This desert city became a recreational and health retreat for vacationers (famous and infamous alike) seeking dry heat and seclusion. Residents and architects embraced the open air climate and lifestyle engendering the design style of "Desert Modernism". Nestled up against the dramatic San Jacinto mountains the cityscape is distinctive for its collection of notable historic architecture as well as the remarkable quantity of pools which are duly noted on the plate in blue. Features: Plate. City On A Plate collection. Material: Porcelain. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Individually boxed with a printed key (map) Designed in Los Angeles. Dimensions: 12" W x 12" D, 2.2 lbs.
  • notNeutral City on a Plate: Berlin
    allmodern.com
    Features: Made of porcelain. Dishwasher and microwave safe.
  • Anorak Rolling Hills Melamine Plate
    amara.com
    Material: melamine. Dimensions: 25.5cm. Rolling Hills design. Green hills on a cream background. Wipe clean with a damp cloth. Not suitable for microwaving. Not dishwasher safe.
  • notNeutral City On A Plate: San Francisco
    allmodern.com
    The original City Plate was a commemorative platter in honor of the 2006 AIA Convention, which was hosted by Los Angeles. The notNeutral parent firm, the Rios Clementi Hale Studios, had been working on a series of diagrams for their Civic Park project in downtown Los Angeles, looking at elements such as open space, circulation, and land use in the downtown core relative to the urban context of greater Los Angeles. A draft of the plan was up on one the common walls in the studio that notNeutral and the Rios Clementi Hale Studios share, and, typical of the cross-disciplinary interplay, notNeutral had the inspiration to translate the diagram onto a ceramic plate. The reductive graphics of the diagram and the recognizable pattern of LA streets and landmarks translated well to the medium. The response to the plate at the Convention was very enthusiastic ('Do my city!'), and the notNeutral expanded the idea into a series of plates. The result was a line of City Plates, released in series of four, which look at cities as a graphic language of line, color, and pattern as a means to investigate the cultural, economic, historical, and political impacts on city form. Each series has a particular conceptual framework that relates the four cities to each other, and the series as a whole operates within an ecological matrix organized by patterns of urban development: organic, baroque, gridded, and eclectic. The idea was that as the series evolved, the City Plates would form a network of relationships to each other that would allow people to design their own combination of plates (American cities, Coastal cities, Colonial cities, for example) that would allow interesting comparisons. This methodology led the notNeutral to some of the great cities of the world, and also to some less well-known cities that warrant attention. Each plate celebrates the beauty implicit in a city's unique form, a distinct pattern that has evolved over time as layers of history are inscribed into the urban landscape. The California Gold Rush put San Francisco on the map for tens of thousands of Americans and immigrants from around the world who were in search of buried treasure. What was once a small settlement became a boomtown connected to the rest of world by sea and rail. The pioneering and entrepreneurial outlook that helped San Francisco recover from the devastating earthquake and fire of 1906 is a quality that is still palpable in the city today. Features: Plate. City On A Plate collection. Material: Porcelain. Dishwasher and microwave safe. Individually boxed with a printed key (map) Designed in Los Angeles. Dimensions: 12" W x 12" D, 2.2 lbs.
  • Swirl White Square 4 Piece Place Setting
    mikasa.com
    Clean lines rendered in a rustic, earthy pattern. Swirl's rich, double finish- smooth and glossy finish in the center with a ribbed and matte finish on the rim- sets a striking and original table. Generous serving pieces and unique organic shapes make laying out any meal a treat for host and guest alike. Made of Ironstone with a pin-firing technique which allows the entire bottom of the plate to be glazed including the base. This process significantly reduces water absorption and increases chip resistance. Dishwasher and microwave safe. This 4 piece place setting includes a 10-3/4 inch square Dinner Plate, 8-3/4 inch square Salad Plate, 18 ounce Square Mug and 24 ounce Square Soup Bowl.
  • yummy brunch
    Styling idea
  • Sur La Table Fish Salad Plate
    surlatable.com
    Add a touch of coastal charm to any table with our new terra cotta Fish collection. Hand finished with an attractive fish design, Fish plates are perfect for both indoor and outdoor entertaining and clean up easily in the dishwasher. Pair with coordinating Fish dinnerware for a complementary set or mix and match with your favorite whiteware to add a maritime touch to any meal. Manufacturer: Sur La Table. Material: Terra cotta. Care: Dishwasher safe. Dimensions: 8¾" x 1" Made in Portugal exclusively for Sur La Table.
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