Stamp Camp New Images Page 22
  • Brush Bundle Vol 1 Photoshop Brushes
    designfruit.com
    This Royalty-free Photoshop brush bundle is a package deal containing 3 complete brush sets from the Designfruit collection. This fusion of Stitchy Circles, Flowering Frenzy and Doodle Dandy is full of diversity. The Doodle Dandy Photoshop brush set contains 24 high-resolution designs that Jason Gaylor sketched on paper and compiled digitally into abstract compositions. This hodgepodge of stars, swirls, keyboards, circles and more merge to create retro compositions with a tinge of psychedelic influence. Mix and match the individual pieces and create your own montage of clouds, leaves, suns, squiggly strips and corner pieces. Great for scrapbooking! The Flowering Frenzy set is 18 high-resolution Photoshop Brushes inspired by nature and mashed up with some digital craftiness. With a full variety of blooming flowers, wiry vines, and playful greenery you can push any photo or design over the top. As always, these are great for scrapbooking too. Plaster your next digital scrapbook page with these wonderfully creative brushes. The Stitchy Circles set is 24 high-resolution Photoshop brushes Inspired by quilt patterns and circular borders, intricate, retro, ribbon-like vines wrap around complex circle patterns as if they were stitched or sewn. This brush set is light and frilly; combining lacy-filigree with dot patterns, zig-zag lines, geometric shapes and ornate, victorian embellishments. All the original designed circles are single brushes larger than 2400 pixels in diameter. Many of the other brushes are layered circles with strokes, and designed for easy placement in the corner of a composition, photo or other graphic layout. The sets are royalty-free, so you can use them in your products and designs both for personal use and commercial work. Download a free sample of the brushes and try them out.
  • Stickers ampoules design - Stickers muraux - Mandellia
    mandellia.fr
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    vistaprint.com
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    coreldraw.com
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    stampcamp.com
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  • About A Girl Caroline Polachek
    blog.urbanoutfitters.com
    All hail Caroline Polachek! The Chairlift frontwoman is a veritable force, from her recent side project Ramona Lisa to her killer fashion sense to her no-nonsense attitude about making music that is right for right now. We took a walk with her through Brooklyn and talked about her white wine and chocolate backstage rider, drawing inspiration from Chinese hand-dancing techniques, and the art of creating a mood that generates the 'right amount of disorientation.' Photos by Claire Cottrell Ramona Lisa October 13th in NYC at Le Poisson Rouge Has going out on your own been liberating? What freedoms — and challenges — come out of performing solo? Definitely, it was a strange sensation to just be able to make something and perform it without really conferring with anyone. The first Ramona Lisa show, I played with Marissa Nadler and Elysian Fields, and they let me join the bill as Ramona Lisa to try out this new thing without having a clue what I was doing or what Ramona Lisa was. The day of the show, as I got dressed up to sing fully in costume with the — still rough — choreography, I was actually concerned that I'd totally lost my mind. The nice thing about being in a band is you have other people there who understand and keep you grounded, but I had really not told anyone what this was. I just had to trust in the music and images and be led by them. How do ideas for songs strike you — do you work first from lyrics and then develop music to fit into them, or vice versa? Every song is different, but most often it starts with a melody. I usually catch myself singing a tune and then record on my phone, and then later build the arrangement around it, adding lyrics last, which is always very hard. Lyrics are very difficult for me, they take the longest, since i'm so picky. Sometimes a lyric comes first, which has it's own rhythm and melody just to the way it's spoken, and then the rest of the song comes very naturally out of that. And then sometimes i'll be playing around with a sound or instrumental progression, and then almost 'hear' the melody and lyrics in it, like with 'Arcadia,' so it's more a matter of deduction. You've discussed how you don't see Ramona Lisa as an alter ego, but rather as a way to express a certain set of ideas and directions. Now that you're looking at the project in hindsight, what are some of these themes and thoughts that come through repeatedly? Seasons, fate in the form of biological clock, like the feeling of something happening that's bigger than you but also inside you, telling you what to do, and how love is like all of those things. Ramona Lisa sets up a way for me to look at that either from the inside, in expressionistic songs like 'Izzit True What They Tell Me' and 'I Love Our World' or from the outside, on songs like 'Dominic' and 'Lady's Got Gills,' which take advantage of a sort of classical tradition and humor. How is the choreography developed? What is the inspiration there? The choreography started as an interpretation of the lyrics and music, because sometimes the lyrics might be too discreet or inaudible, so I wanted to have them be accessible from multiple angles. There are also moods or states in the songs that aren't possible explain with lyrics, so sometimes dance can put it more plainly. Because I need my hands free, I sing into a microphone on a stand, and so my feet are generally stuck within a pretty narrow radius of the mic stand. This lead to an interest both in Chinese hand-dancing techniques, which is very beautiful in a sort of alien and plant-like way, and the poses in Egyptian hieroglyphics, which are expressive even without movement. So the vocabulary of the dances started to take on that implacably exotic sort of feeling, even while our costumes are distinctly European in style. I didn't want it to feel like 'fusion,' but just a very essential dream feeling. How did the idea for the face-painted eye as a symbol develop? The additional pair of eyes on the cheeks came from the 'false eye' that insects and fish evolved to deflect predators. I find it really beautiful and
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  • Brands We Love Ryder
    blog.urbanoutfitters.com
    After routinely finding herself digging through vintage and used clothing multiple times a week (and running out of people willing to tag along with her on her endless shopping trips), Penny Brown decided to take the next most logical step: form her own clothing brand. While getting started was more time-consuming than Penny could have imagined, her brand Ryder has grown exponentially in its first two years of existence. Starting in Australia in 2012, the label has already made its way to the United States; a big milestone for any brand. Blending her vintage aesthetics with an updated, modern twist, Penny has created a brand that's perfect for laid-back girls who rely on timeless pieces to carry them through the seasons. Chatting with Penny from her home in Australia, we talked to Penny about her start in the industry, her forever style icons, and what advice she has for other aspiring designers out there. How did you get your start in fashion? PB: I really fell into it. Just took every opportunity before me and followed what made me click. Many years back I found myself spending most of my time outside trawling through piles of vintage at any market I could get myself to. I would drag my sisters and friends to country town flea markers and vintage fairs. I started noticing the cycle of fashion and how old can become new. With a little love and the right combinations something that was overlooked can be made a treasure. It wasn’t for a long time that I realized that my passion could become my full-time job. I began working alongside an incredibly talented Australian designer who then mentored me through the next phases where I uncovered my abilities and my drive to make my dream become a reality. Ryder was born in 2012 and I haven't looked back! Can you share some specific sources of inspiration? PB: I find a lot of inspiration in the variety of the Australian landscape and I think this shines through in my choices of prints and color palettes. I grew up on windy beaches, hiking on holiday through the Australian bush with my family. Traveling overseas opened my eyes to global trends and the continual transformation of fashion, but every time I come home, I'm never short on finding inspiration from the laid-back culture of Australia, comfortable and free. I love that clothing can express who you are and how you are perceived, and I love allowing customers to feel that in a unique yet easy way. Inspiration always comes from the little things, when I least expect it. I have a tiny idea that connects with me and then it weaves throughout my next collection. I love to revitalize an old look my mum used to wear or a great vintage print, making it new again and creating a look that can slot into a variety of wardrobes for years to come. How would you describe Ryder’s aesthetic? PB: I am happiest barefoot in denim shorts, with sand between my toes. And I hope this feeling flows through everything I create. Ryder is designed for the urban nymph, traveling the world in cool comfort. Each collection is made up of a mix of flannel, denim, lace and leather, transforming inspirations from the past and present into a new wardrobe. It's all meant to be dressed up, dressed down, or thrown into a backpack and worn wherever you unpack. Offer two pieces of advice to your 20-year-old self. PB: Follow that gut feeling and do what makes you happy! I wouldn’t change my journey to where I am today, but I knew I was never going to be content letting my creativity lay low and I had an instinct that told me I would end up sharing it in an exciting way. I wasn’t confident to take risks and it took a while for me to work out how creativity and passion could become my way of life. Walk us through a typical day-in-the-life. PB: My black Labrador, Billie, takes me for a jog every morning, then doesn’t leave my side all day. We head into the shop and spend the morning working on upcoming ranges, chasing samples, making changes and generally getting lost in Ryder. I find running a business makes it easy to get stuck doing the logistical side, so I try to
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  • About A Space Williamsburg Warehouse
    blog.urbanoutfitters.com
    We are always interested in discovering the living spaces of the designers we work with. Curious to see the apartment of one of our favorite creative couples, Jessica Barensfeld and Simon Howell, we paid a visit to their bright, airy, and art-filled loft in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Photos by Emily Johnston Jessica is a jewelry designer and Simon's background is in photography. Together, they have also started Lynn & Lawrence, a collaborative line of hand-knit alpaca and wool hats hand-knit in Yorkshire, England by a team of knitters headed up by Simon's mom Both Barensfeld's jewelry and Lynn & Lawrence's hats are available at Space Ninety 8 in Williamsburg. Jessica moved into the apartment first, in 2006, living with a friend from RISD. 'So many people have lived here,' she explains. 'So many parties have happened here, so many trash cans have been owned here!' Originally the bottom floor was one big open space — 'It used to be very raw and totally open,' she says. 'It was crazy, we used to throw knives at the wall and spray paint, we would never lock our door and some crazy kid walked in and drew all over the walls once.' When Jessica and Simon started dating and took over the apartment lease, they got serious about transforming the open warehouse into the warm and comfortable living space it is today by breaking up the open floorplan, painting everything a crisp white, and bringing in color from art and plenty of plants. As Simon puts it, 'We became the apartment's parents. We all grew up.' In the back of the apartment, Simon constructed a space that they now use as a shared office and studio. They kept the living area totally open, which makes it feel like a courtyard that the other rooms are centered around. Surfboard storage going up the stairs — together, Jessica and Simon own five surfboards: 'a Fineline Avenger 9'2', Alex Knost Twin Keel 5'5', Fineline Egg 8', 9'2' Walden epoxy beater, and Annabelle, an old fixer upper who is basically art against the wall,' Jessica explains. A lofted library on the second floor, which they use for reading, drawing, painting, and getting away from the computer. A friend gave Jessica and Simon the giant paper bulb lanterns that hang from the ceiling. 'At night they look like two big moons and once a month the real moon shines through the window and we have 3 full moons,' Jessica says. 'It's a pretty picture.' Kooks the cat chilling on the bed. A good afternoon always involves stopping for a cup of tea — especially at the wooden farm table Jessica built! Shop Industrial Furniture Shop Apartment
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  • 5119H - climbing blooms: Impress Rubber Stamps
    impressrubberstamps.com
    Impress Rubber Stamps is your source for 5119H - climbing blooms, rubber stamps, nature, and handmade card making ideas.
  • About A Space Williamsburg Warehouse
    blog.urbanoutfitters.com
    We are always interested in discovering the living spaces of the designers we work with. Curious to see the apartment of one of our favorite creative couples, Jessica Barensfeld and Simon Howell, we paid a visit to their bright, airy, and art-filled loft in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Photos by Emily Johnston Jessica is a jewelry designer and Simon's background is in photography. Together, they have also started Lynn & Lawrence, a collaborative line of hand-knit alpaca and wool hats hand-knit in Yorkshire, England by a team of knitters headed up by Simon's mom Both Barensfeld's jewelry and Lynn & Lawrence's hats are available at Space Ninety 8 in Williamsburg. Jessica moved into the apartment first, in 2006, living with a friend from RISD. 'So many people have lived here,' she explains. 'So many parties have happened here, so many trash cans have been owned here!' Originally the bottom floor was one big open space — 'It used to be very raw and totally open,' she says. 'It was crazy, we used to throw knives at the wall and spray paint, we would never lock our door and some crazy kid walked in and drew all over the walls once.' When Jessica and Simon started dating and took over the apartment lease, they got serious about transforming the open warehouse into the warm and comfortable living space it is today by breaking up the open floorplan, painting everything a crisp white, and bringing in color from art and plenty of plants. As Simon puts it, 'We became the apartment's parents. We all grew up.' In the back of the apartment, Simon constructed a space that they now use as a shared office and studio. They kept the living area totally open, which makes it feel like a courtyard that the other rooms are centered around. Surfboard storage going up the stairs — together, Jessica and Simon own five surfboards: 'a Fineline Avenger 9'2', Alex Knost Twin Keel 5'5', Fineline Egg 8', 9'2' Walden epoxy beater, and Annabelle, an old fixer upper who is basically art against the wall,' Jessica explains. A lofted library on the second floor, which they use for reading, drawing, painting, and getting away from the computer. A friend gave Jessica and Simon the giant paper bulb lanterns that hang from the ceiling. 'At night they look like two big moons and once a month the real moon shines through the window and we have 3 full moons,' Jessica says. 'It's a pretty picture.' Kooks the cat chilling on the bed. A good afternoon always involves stopping for a cup of tea — especially at the wooden farm table Jessica built! Shop Industrial Furniture Shop Apartment
  • Doodle Dandy Photoshop Brushes
    designfruit.com
    The Doodle Dandy Photoshop brush set contains 24 high-resolution designs that Jason Gaylor sketched on paper and compiled digitally into abstract compositions. This hodgepodge of stars, swirls, keyboards, circles and more merge to create retro compositions with a tinge of psychedelic influence. Mix and match the individual pieces and create your own montage of clouds, leaves, suns, squiggly strips and corner pieces. Great for scrapbooking! It's royalty-free, so you can use it in your products and designs both for personal use and commercial work; with no strings attached. Download a free sample and try it out.
  • About A Space Williamsburg Warehouse
    blog.urbanoutfitters.com
    We are always interested in discovering the living spaces of the designers we work with. Curious to see the apartment of one of our favorite creative couples, Jessica Barensfeld and Simon Howell, we paid a visit to their bright, airy, and art-filled loft in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Photos by Emily Johnston Jessica is a jewelry designer and Simon's background is in photography. Together, they have also started Lynn & Lawrence, a collaborative line of hand-knit alpaca and wool hats hand-knit in Yorkshire, England by a team of knitters headed up by Simon's mom Both Barensfeld's jewelry and Lynn & Lawrence's hats are available at Space Ninety 8 in Williamsburg. Jessica moved into the apartment first, in 2006, living with a friend from RISD. 'So many people have lived here,' she explains. 'So many parties have happened here, so many trash cans have been owned here!' Originally the bottom floor was one big open space — 'It used to be very raw and totally open,' she says. 'It was crazy, we used to throw knives at the wall and spray paint, we would never lock our door and some crazy kid walked in and drew all over the walls once.' When Jessica and Simon started dating and took over the apartment lease, they got serious about transforming the open warehouse into the warm and comfortable living space it is today by breaking up the open floorplan, painting everything a crisp white, and bringing in color from art and plenty of plants. As Simon puts it, 'We became the apartment's parents. We all grew up.' In the back of the apartment, Simon constructed a space that they now use as a shared office and studio. They kept the living area totally open, which makes it feel like a courtyard that the other rooms are centered around. Surfboard storage going up the stairs — together, Jessica and Simon own five surfboards: 'a Fineline Avenger 9'2', Alex Knost Twin Keel 5'5', Fineline Egg 8', 9'2' Walden epoxy beater, and Annabelle, an old fixer upper who is basically art against the wall,' Jessica explains. A lofted library on the second floor, which they use for reading, drawing, painting, and getting away from the computer. A friend gave Jessica and Simon the giant paper bulb lanterns that hang from the ceiling. 'At night they look like two big moons and once a month the real moon shines through the window and we have 3 full moons,' Jessica says. 'It's a pretty picture.' Kooks the cat chilling on the bed. A good afternoon always involves stopping for a cup of tea — especially at the wooden farm table Jessica built! Shop Industrial Furniture Shop Apartment
  • 20 Free Illustrator Art Brushes: Ink Sketch Lines | Room122
    room122.com
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    • RhineStones Spiral on Universalscrapbook - Scrapbooking Logos Sharing
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  • About A Space Williamsburg Warehouse
    blog.urbanoutfitters.com
    We are always interested in discovering the living spaces of the designers we work with. Curious to see the apartment of one of our favorite creative couples, Jessica Barensfeld and Simon Howell, we paid a visit to their bright, airy, and art-filled loft in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Photos by Emily Johnston Jessica is a jewelry designer and Simon's background is in photography. Together, they have also started Lynn & Lawrence, a collaborative line of hand-knit alpaca and wool hats hand-knit in Yorkshire, England by a team of knitters headed up by Simon's mom Both Barensfeld's jewelry and Lynn & Lawrence's hats are available at Space Ninety 8 in Williamsburg. Jessica moved into the apartment first, in 2006, living with a friend from RISD. 'So many people have lived here,' she explains. 'So many parties have happened here, so many trash cans have been owned here!' Originally the bottom floor was one big open space — 'It used to be very raw and totally open,' she says. 'It was crazy, we used to throw knives at the wall and spray paint, we would never lock our door and some crazy kid walked in and drew all over the walls once.' When Jessica and Simon started dating and took over the apartment lease, they got serious about transforming the open warehouse into the warm and comfortable living space it is today by breaking up the open floorplan, painting everything a crisp white, and bringing in color from art and plenty of plants. As Simon puts it, 'We became the apartment's parents. We all grew up.' In the back of the apartment, Simon constructed a space that they now use as a shared office and studio. They kept the living area totally open, which makes it feel like a courtyard that the other rooms are centered around. Surfboard storage going up the stairs — together, Jessica and Simon own five surfboards: 'a Fineline Avenger 9'2', Alex Knost Twin Keel 5'5', Fineline Egg 8', 9'2' Walden epoxy beater, and Annabelle, an old fixer upper who is basically art against the wall,' Jessica explains. A lofted library on the second floor, which they use for reading, drawing, painting, and getting away from the computer. A friend gave Jessica and Simon the giant paper bulb lanterns that hang from the ceiling. 'At night they look like two big moons and once a month the real moon shines through the window and we have 3 full moons,' Jessica says. 'It's a pretty picture.' Kooks the cat chilling on the bed. A good afternoon always involves stopping for a cup of tea — especially at the wooden farm table Jessica built! Shop Industrial Furniture Shop Apartment
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  • UO Interviews Jeff Luker
    blog.urbanoutfitters.com
    Jeff Luker's photography makes us want to get out and explore. From the desert to the beach, cliff-jumping to skateboarding, the unifying theme behind his work is its capturing of adventure and discovery — take us along for the ride, please! After working with him on our most recent men's lookbook, shot at the amazing Delaware Water Gap, we pulled Jeff aside for a few questions about exploring, trips to no-man's land, and his goals for fall. Can you share more about how you came into photography? How has your work changed over time? My whole life I have always had an obsession with documenting things via photo or video, whether that was snapping photos at family events as a kid or making skate videos with my friends in high school. I went to film school at Emerson College in Boston, but I ended up spending all my time in the darkroom working on photo projects. After school I was kind of restless, so my friends set out and we lived on the road for several months traveling all over the country and taking photos. And then I got hooked on that whole travel vibe and just kept going on trips taking photos. Eventually people saw my work were into it, so I got asked me to be in shows and magazines and shoot commercial, fashion and editorial jobs. Not much has changed as far as my approach, I still have the same outlook towards taking photos, but it became my full time job, so I get to focus all my energy on it. So I just feel blessed and I'm always trying to keep pushing the work to new places. What personal projects are you working on right now? I have been working on this project, the last few years, which eventually will end up as a book. The project is titled A Wilderness Condition , and it is a photographic study about the wild parts of America and our relationship with those places. It has been this ongoing project that I keep working and it seems like there is always somewhere else I want to go and shoot for it, so I am not sure when it will be done. So I don't really have a deadline but I'm just working on it continually in between shooting for other projects. Do you approach personal work with a concept in mind and develop work around that, or just go out and shoot and edit it down and tie it together thematically after the fact? My approach is pretty loose, it is just sort of always traveling and taking photos wherever I go. There are definitely places that I seek out because I want to photograph them. But I think it is important to be open and just let photos find you as well. My commissioned projects of course are more calculated because of timing and production, so I try to keep my personal work more organic and free forming and then I go back and look at all over my photos over several months and edit that together. What are some specific themes, concepts, or ideas that are interesting to you right now? I'm really into just big open spaces right now. I was driving through Idaho recently and there was this long stretch of highway that went through an old nuclear testing area, and it was just so sprawling and empty in all directions, no cars or buildings for miles. And I've been finding a lot of those places lately, sort of no man's lands, all over the west in places like Arizona, Nevada, and New Mexico. I grew up on the east coast where it is super crowded and now I live in Portland, OR where it just seems like there are so many people camping and in the woods all the time you can't escape the crowds. I think as the world feels more and more crowded it has been interesting to be able to find and photograph these places that are away from everything, that really feel like the absolute middle of nowhere. What's your preferred format to shoot? Any particular camera, gear, accessory you are always loyal to? I shoot mostly 35mm film. It has always been my favorite format, just the size, dimension and the quality of the image. I always have a point and shoot film camera everywhere I go, either a Contax or a Yashica. But I'm really stoked on digital photography, so I've been shooting a lot of that too, love the Canon 5d Mk
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  • UO Interviews Jeff Luker
    blog.urbanoutfitters.com
    Jeff Luker's photography makes us want to get out and explore. From the desert to the beach, cliff-jumping to skateboarding, the unifying theme behind his work is its capturing of adventure and discovery — take us along for the ride, please! After working with him on our most recent men's lookbook, shot at the amazing Delaware Water Gap, we pulled Jeff aside for a few questions about exploring, trips to no-man's land, and his goals for fall. Can you share more about how you came into photography? How has your work changed over time? My whole life I have always had an obsession with documenting things via photo or video, whether that was snapping photos at family events as a kid or making skate videos with my friends in high school. I went to film school at Emerson College in Boston, but I ended up spending all my time in the darkroom working on photo projects. After school I was kind of restless, so my friends set out and we lived on the road for several months traveling all over the country and taking photos. And then I got hooked on that whole travel vibe and just kept going on trips taking photos. Eventually people saw my work were into it, so I got asked me to be in shows and magazines and shoot commercial, fashion and editorial jobs. Not much has changed as far as my approach, I still have the same outlook towards taking photos, but it became my full time job, so I get to focus all my energy on it. So I just feel blessed and I'm always trying to keep pushing the work to new places. What personal projects are you working on right now? I have been working on this project, the last few years, which eventually will end up as a book. The project is titled A Wilderness Condition , and it is a photographic study about the wild parts of America and our relationship with those places. It has been this ongoing project that I keep working and it seems like there is always somewhere else I want to go and shoot for it, so I am not sure when it will be done. So I don't really have a deadline but I'm just working on it continually in between shooting for other projects. Do you approach personal work with a concept in mind and develop work around that, or just go out and shoot and edit it down and tie it together thematically after the fact? My approach is pretty loose, it is just sort of always traveling and taking photos wherever I go. There are definitely places that I seek out because I want to photograph them. But I think it is important to be open and just let photos find you as well. My commissioned projects of course are more calculated because of timing and production, so I try to keep my personal work more organic and free forming and then I go back and look at all over my photos over several months and edit that together. What are some specific themes, concepts, or ideas that are interesting to you right now? I'm really into just big open spaces right now. I was driving through Idaho recently and there was this long stretch of highway that went through an old nuclear testing area, and it was just so sprawling and empty in all directions, no cars or buildings for miles. And I've been finding a lot of those places lately, sort of no man's lands, all over the west in places like Arizona, Nevada, and New Mexico. I grew up on the east coast where it is super crowded and now I live in Portland, OR where it just seems like there are so many people camping and in the woods all the time you can't escape the crowds. I think as the world feels more and more crowded it has been interesting to be able to find and photograph these places that are away from everything, that really feel like the absolute middle of nowhere. What's your preferred format to shoot? Any particular camera, gear, accessory you are always loyal to? I shoot mostly 35mm film. It has always been my favorite format, just the size, dimension and the quality of the image. I always have a point and shoot film camera everywhere I go, either a Contax or a Yashica. But I'm really stoked on digital photography, so I've been shooting a lot of that too, love the Canon 5d Mk
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