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    Red tulips blue green sky muted shades Title: The Color of Love Size: 8x10 This fine art photo will be printed by a professional lab on premium
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  • About A Band Halsey
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    “I’m making s’mores for breakfast, because I’m not a grownup,” 20-year-old Ashley Frangipane jokes in a baby voice. She’s at her manager’s house in Los Angeles, back from a cross-country tour opening up 19,000 audience arena shows and taking a break from raiding the kitchen to talk on the phone. Considering she’s got the sweet tooth of someone half her age, Ashley’s doing some pretty big things. Under her stage name, Halsey, she’s garnered a devoted fan following (600 thousand Instagram followers and counting) that's been growing ever since she released her first single “Ghost” a year ago. The stinging pop melodies and feminist anthems she continues to put out have solidified her standing as, in her own words, the New Americana. And that’s only the beginning; Halsey has just released her first full-length album, Badlands (a follow-up to last year's Room 93 EP), and now she's hitting the road once again for a string of sold-out headlining shows. It's these complexities—say, opening for Imagine Dragons one day and eating s’mores for breakfast the next—that make Halsey so fascinating. It's also what fuels her confidence in herself: “That uncomfortable place that used to make me feel like I wasn’t accepted anywhere, I’ve come to own that,” she says. “Now you can’t pin me down and put me in one place—I’m multidimensional.” Buy the Album / Shop Her Picks Photos by Luca Venter When your first single, “Ghost” came out, you were using the Internet as your main avenue to release music. Now, only a year or so later, you’re playing to huge arena audiences. What does that feel like? It’s a blessing and a curse because it means anything I’m excited about [my fans] are equally excited about. But then sometimes it gets frustrating having so many people involved, because sometimes a very small thing can be made very big. If I favorite a tweet or if I’m seen somewhere wearing something, it becomes a fucking national news topic overnight because of how many people are invested in what I do. But that’s the thing about having an audience; all eyes are on you and you have to decide how you’re going to handle that. You seem to have the confidence to handle that well, despite the fact that being a 20-year-old woman who’s building her presence in the music industry is a very intimidating position to be in. Confidence isn’t something you just have or you don’t; it’s something that develops. I’ve been confident my entire life but for different reasons. When I was a really young kid, I was super confident because I was very smart. I was a super good student and I liked to have conversations with adults. Then I became an adolescent and I went through puberty and went from being this really ugly, nerdy, smart kid to being someone that people suddenly found attractive after bullying me for my whole childhood—so my newfound confidence was an attractive confidence. [When] I entered the music industry I realized I’m going to work really hard and I’m going to do this and that confidence shifted. Now I walk into a room and I know that I can hold my own with anyone in that room because I run my own business, I’m true to my art, and I’m proud of who I am. So confidence comes naturally to you? I think confidence is something that comes from different places, and my entire life I’ve latched onto different things to become confident about. It’s funny because maybe that stems from insecurity, that need to have something to be confident and proud of, which is pretty ironic in retrospect. I’ve always been self aware, and I’ve always been sure of myself because I’ve always fallen in between everywhere in my life. I didn’t really fit in anywhere. I think that was the best thing that ever happened to me. Being the type of artist I am, I really don’t fit in anywhere now. I’m not really an alternative artist, I’m not really a pop artist, I’m not really much of anything. People have a hard time pigeonholing me and I like that. Based on your massively loyal fan base, it’s obvious you’re not the only one who feels this way. They seem to relate. Well that’s why they help m
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  • About A Band Halsey
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    “I’m making s’mores for breakfast, because I’m not a grownup,” 20-year-old Ashley Frangipane jokes in a baby voice. She’s at her manager’s house in Los Angeles, back from a cross-country tour opening up 19,000 audience arena shows and taking a break from raiding the kitchen to talk on the phone. Considering she’s got the sweet tooth of someone half her age, Ashley’s doing some pretty big things. Under her stage name, Halsey, she’s garnered a devoted fan following (600 thousand Instagram followers and counting) that's been growing ever since she released her first single “Ghost” a year ago. The stinging pop melodies and feminist anthems she continues to put out have solidified her standing as, in her own words, the New Americana. And that’s only the beginning; Halsey has just released her first full-length album, Badlands (a follow-up to last year's Room 93 EP), and now she's hitting the road once again for a string of sold-out headlining shows. It's these complexities—say, opening for Imagine Dragons one day and eating s’mores for breakfast the next—that make Halsey so fascinating. It's also what fuels her confidence in herself: “That uncomfortable place that used to make me feel like I wasn’t accepted anywhere, I’ve come to own that,” she says. “Now you can’t pin me down and put me in one place—I’m multidimensional.” Buy the Album / Shop Her Picks Photos by Luca Venter When your first single, “Ghost” came out, you were using the Internet as your main avenue to release music. Now, only a year or so later, you’re playing to huge arena audiences. What does that feel like? It’s a blessing and a curse because it means anything I’m excited about [my fans] are equally excited about. But then sometimes it gets frustrating having so many people involved, because sometimes a very small thing can be made very big. If I favorite a tweet or if I’m seen somewhere wearing something, it becomes a fucking national news topic overnight because of how many people are invested in what I do. But that’s the thing about having an audience; all eyes are on you and you have to decide how you’re going to handle that. You seem to have the confidence to handle that well, despite the fact that being a 20-year-old woman who’s building her presence in the music industry is a very intimidating position to be in. Confidence isn’t something you just have or you don’t; it’s something that develops. I’ve been confident my entire life but for different reasons. When I was a really young kid, I was super confident because I was very smart. I was a super good student and I liked to have conversations with adults. Then I became an adolescent and I went through puberty and went from being this really ugly, nerdy, smart kid to being someone that people suddenly found attractive after bullying me for my whole childhood—so my newfound confidence was an attractive confidence. [When] I entered the music industry I realized I’m going to work really hard and I’m going to do this and that confidence shifted. Now I walk into a room and I know that I can hold my own with anyone in that room because I run my own business, I’m true to my art, and I’m proud of who I am. So confidence comes naturally to you? I think confidence is something that comes from different places, and my entire life I’ve latched onto different things to become confident about. It’s funny because maybe that stems from insecurity, that need to have something to be confident and proud of, which is pretty ironic in retrospect. I’ve always been self aware, and I’ve always been sure of myself because I’ve always fallen in between everywhere in my life. I didn’t really fit in anywhere. I think that was the best thing that ever happened to me. Being the type of artist I am, I really don’t fit in anywhere now. I’m not really an alternative artist, I’m not really a pop artist, I’m not really much of anything. People have a hard time pigeonholing me and I like that. Based on your massively loyal fan base, it’s obvious you’re not the only one who feels this way. They seem to relate. Well that’s why they help m
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    ~ Since 031210 ♥ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Never give up on the things that makes you smile ♥ Hello...
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    THEY ALL LOOK SO GOOD.
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