Victoria Bold. A Victorian kind of crazy.

Victoria Bold. A Victorian kind of crazy.
Moderated by scribblegoat.
Leave faded pastels to the world of nostalgia and celebrate the vibrancy of the true Victorian Age, a time when the world was getting bigger and brighter by the day and when chartreuse and bubblegum pink were a perfectly acceptable combination for evening wear.
 
Every style of set with items or inspirations dating from roughly 1811 to 1912 is welcome, but keep it as brilliant as the era.
 
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Steampunk and other alternate-history styles are more than welcome provided that your set is recognizably Victorian. International inspirations are gleefully invited. While shabby-chic sets are lovely, there are several groups for them; Victoria Bold is for, well, bolder looks.
 
This is a group for wondrous color and eager exploration of a time period that spans from the English Regency (starting in 1811) to 'long about the sinking of the Titanic (1912). Broadly, if your inspiration comes from after the beginning of the 19th century but before World War II, we'd love to have it here. But keep it bright!
 
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While we tend to forget this in the haze of antique nostalgia, the Victorian Era was a bold and brilliant time. Victoria Regina herself was a proud and independent woman. She got crabby when Parliament didn't tell her what they were doing. She had a passionate sexual love for her husband Alfred and wasn't shy about who knew it (the "lie back and think of England" thing is a myth). She collected friends from all over the world, persuaded them to call her Mother, and bossed them around just as she did her own sons.
 
The world around her was growing ever more cosmopolitan. Though the ethics of empire were questionable, the results included an intercultural fascination with other people. Many an English lady prized an Indian shawl in the 1840s; many a Japanese samurai's bride adopted the bustle-gown style in the 1880s.
 
And perhaps most exciting to fashionable men and women alike: the invention of aniline dyes meant that, for the first time, anyone with the money could wear a true royal purple.
 
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Victoria Bold will have Victorian-themed contests on a regular basis, but submit any style of Victorian set to our gallery whenever you like!
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