Vitra - Miniature W1 Chair
  • Vitra - Miniature B3 Wassily
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    Marcel Breuer was one of the most important designers of the early modern age. His biography is closely linked to the history of the Bauhaus, founded by Walter Gropius in 1919. The club chair B3, known today as »Wassily« was also created in connection with this renowned institution. lt is the first piece of seating furniture in the history of design to be made from seamless, precision-drawn tubular steel. lts transparency and visible structure are expressions of the stringent aesthetic approach that prevailed in architecture and design following World War I. Marcel Breuer replaced the massive upholstered corpus of the traditional club chair with a skeleton-like construction made out of bent steel tubing, thereby overcoming the physical weightiness of conventional seating. He exploited the elasticity of the material, complementing it with tautly stretched fabric strips of reinforced canvas for the seat and back. The B3 did not acquire the name »Wassily« until the beginning of the sixties, when the Italian furniture producer Dino Gavina purchased the manufacturing rights: Marcel Breuer had designed the armchair for the house of the painter Wassily Kandinsky, who taught at the Bauhaus from 1922 until 1933. The original of the Wassily B3 was designed by Marcel Breuer in 1925 and it is produced as 1:1 model by The Knoll Group, New York/USA since 1968. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of nickel plated steel tube and black leather.
  • Vitra - Miniature Eames LCM Chair
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    Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen designed a chair in 1940 with a new type of three-dimensional pre-shaped plywood seat for a competition held by the New York Museum of Modern Art. The chair did not go into production owing to a lack of technical know-how. It was very rare back then for plywood to be successfully pressed into a three-dimensional shape. In the years that followed, Charles and Ray Eames concentrated on developing a process that enabled plywood to be shaped as they wanted. The »Plywood Chairs« DCW (Dining Chair Wood), LCW (Lounge Chair Wood) and the versions with metal legs, namely DCM (Dining Chair Metal) and LCM were the result of these years of experimentation. In 1945 Charles and Ray Eames again took up the idea of a seat made of formed plywood without, however, coming up with satisfactory solutions. As a consequence, they rejected the idea of a multifunctional seat and decided to treat seat and back as separate, freely articulated elements that were linked with each other via a backbone – the frame. Each component is therefore reduced to a clearly defined function which it fulfills with a minimum of materials being used. The rubber »shock mounts« glued onto the wood enable the seat and back to be connected to the frame. The original of the Eames LCM Chair was designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1945 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Herman Miller Furniture Company, Zeeland/Michigan/USA as well as the Vitra International AG, Basel/Switzerland since 1957. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of black plywood and nickel plated steel tube.
  • Vitra - Miniature Aarnio Ball Chair
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    With its simple, striking shape and its bright colors Eero Aarnio's Ball Chair is a typical symbol of the optimistic, consumer-oriented popular culture of the 1960s. Equally apparent is an unconcealed enthusiasm for the technical which also typifies the era: its exposed plastic which allowed even complex shapes to be produced in series relatively easily, at the time something completely new, and its dynamic shape, reminiscent of a space capsule. The idea of this kind of mobile capsule allowing people to sit where they want within the house also anticipates the kind of living concepts discussed in the 1970s for a young, liberal society. On the outside, this gleaming, polished sphere seems cold and futuristic, but its inside reveals a space where users can feel cozy and protected. From the inside outside noise is considerably muffled, allowing users to relax in any number of positions, for example, to sit cross-legged. Mounted on a round metal base just above ground level, the sphere can be completely rotated on its own axis, so that users can vary their view from the »cave«. Ball Chair thus represents a special category of household objects. It is something between a piece of furniture and a piece of architecture and at the same time embodies both the mobile and the established, the fixed. The original of the Aarnio Ball Chair was designed by Eero Aarnio in 1965 and it is produced as 1:1 model by Adelta, Dinslaken/Germany since 1990. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of fiberglass, aluminium and fabrics.
  • Vitra - Miniature La Chaise
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    »La Chaise« was created as an entry for the »Low-Cost Furniture Design« competition held by the Museum of Modern Art in New York. »La Chaise« consists of two paper-thin fiberglass shells glued to each other but separated by hard rubber discs; the intervening space was filled with polystyrene foam. Charles and Ray Eames left the plastic shell un-treated. The base is made of five in part angled metal rods inserted into a cross-shaped wooden structure. The space left open between back and seat is not technically necessary, but instead purely a design element. The intention was to emphasize the chair’s light weight visually by perforating the otherwise large volume of the shell. The original of the La Chaise was designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1948 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra International AG, Basel/Switzerland since 1991. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of fiberglass, an iron rod and lacquered wood.
  • Vitra - Miniature Coconut Chair
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    In contrast to the trend of adapting sitting furniture to the requirements of the human body, George Nelson designs sitting objects from the formal repertoire of spontaneous, popular everyday culture. The shapes he used were strongly stimulated by the art of the 1950s. His symbolic statements promoted a new, very casual form of sitting. Nelson’s Coconut Chair was inspired by the coconut shell. The seat consists of a glass-fibre reinforced plastic shell with upholstery. The three-legged base of tubular steel is stabilized using fine crossbars. One has the impression that the frame spans the floating, swinging form taut and fixes it to the floor. The original of the Coconut Chair was designed by George Nelson in 1955 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra AG, Basel/Switzerland since 1988. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of polished aluminium, steel sheet, foam and leather.
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  • Vitra - Miniature Eames DKR Wire Chair
    connox.com
    Charles and Ray Eames developed this model in connection with the »Low Cost Furniture« competition held by the Museum of Modern Art in New York and for the Herman Miller company, who produced various versions of the chair between 1951 and 1967. As with their plastic chairs, the seats and backs are again modeled on the human body. In the case of DKR, however, the result is a comfortable organic form even though such a hard and cold material as steel wire is used. Manufactured on an industrial scale, it proved possible to sell the chair successfully at a relatively low price. In 1952, the design won the Trail Blazer Award given by the Home Fashions League in the United States. The original of the Eames DKR Wire Chair was designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1950 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra International AG, Basel/Switzerland since 1991. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of chromed iron-wire and an "Eifel-Tower” base.
  • Vitra Heart Cone Side Chair by Verner Panton
    allmodern.com
    Polyurethane foam upholstery. Stainless steel base in satin finish. Dimensions: Overall Height - Top to Bottom: 35 Inches. Overall Width - Side to Side: 40.5 Inches. Overall Depth - Front to Back: 24.5 Inches.
  • Vitra - Miniature Thonet Chair No. 14
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    The ”fourteen” is one of the most successful products of industrial serial-production of the world. It was the standard model out of the bentwood collection by Thonet and is considered as the typical Vienna coffee shop chair. More than 50 million specimens were already sold in 1930. The "fourteen” is kind of still in production, but in a slightly modified form. Michael Thonet developed the bentwood technique in which massive wood is bent inside of iron molds, becoming three dimensional with steam, meaning large designing liberty regarding the shape of wooden objects. For the 2nd half of the 18th century, Thonet’s new shipping system was also revolutionary: the single parts of the chairs were packed extremely space saving, sent to the place they were ordered from, and screwed together at just that place. The Thonet brothers were connected by industrial production and economic thinking in an independent aesthetic, decisively embossing the topic "industrial design”. The original of the chair No. 14 was designed by Muchael Thonet in 1859/1860 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Gebr. Thonet, Vienna/ Gebr. Thonet, Frankenberg/ Thonet Industries Inc. since 1865. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of dyed and lacquered beech wood.
  • Vitra Fauteuil de Salon Chair
    allmodern.com
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    Fauteuil de Salon combines plain surfaces into a complete architectural form with a comfortable seat and backrest. Rediscovered in the archives of the French design engineer, the chair''s colour was adapted for modern tastes. Thanks to the armrests in oiled solid wood and Prouvé''s typical philosophy of focusing on design factors, Fauteuil de Salon goes perfectly with other products in the Prouvé Collection. Features: Designer: Jean Prouve. Dimensions: Overall Height - Top to Bottom: 32.5 Inches. Overall Width - Side to Side: 26.75 Inches. Overall Depth - Front to Back: 33 Inches.
  • Vitra - Miniature Tom Vac Chair
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    The Tom Vac Chair was first realized as one element in a sculpture consisting of 70 stacking chairs named »Totem«. Commissioned by the magazine Domus, it was set up in the centre of Milan during the Salone del Mobile in 1997. The seat shell with the characteristic wave profile is based on earlier versions Ron Arad sketched for the dining room of a house in Tel Aviv. The first small series for »Totem« was created in just four months. Though it is a complicated metal to manufacture, vacuum-formed aluminium proved to be a suitable material. In collaboration with furniture maker Vitra, for whom he had already produced the Well Tempered Chair back in 1986, Ron Arad developed, within a very short time, a version of the Tom Vac Chair suitable for mass production. Seen within the context of Arad’s complete work, which is largely characterized by »one offs«, the chair is something of an innovation by virtue of its industrial and by extension inexpensive production. While the design of the Tom Vac Chair only deviates minimally from the first plan, the flexible seat shell of polypropylene offers a high degree of comfort. The original of the Tom Vac Chair was designed by Ron Arad in 1999 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra AG, Basel/Switzerland, since 1999. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of synthetics and chromed iron-wire.
  • Vitra Basel Side Chair
    allmodern.com
    Backrest cushion: Polyurethane chips and microfibers. Structure and seat cushion: Polyurethane foam and polyester wool. Constructed of natural beech frame. Dimensions: Overall Height - Top to Bottom: 31.5 Inches. Overall Width - Side to Side: 16.75 Inches. Overall Depth - Front to Back: 18.5 Inches.
  • Vitra - Miniature Eames DCW Chair
    connox.com
    In 1940, Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen developed a chair with a novel plywood seat moulded into a three-dimensional form for a competition sponsored by the New York Museum of Modern Art. However, it was not possible to produce the chair commercially, due to inadequate technical methods. It was seldom possible to press the plywood into a three-dimensional form without it breaking or splitting. During the following years, Charles and Ray Eames concentrated their efforts on developing a new method. The plywood chairs DCW (Dining Chair Wood) and LCW (Lounge Chair Wood) are the result of this long-term experimentation. In 1945, Charles and Ray Eames returned to the idea of a seating shell made out of moulded plywood; however the results were unsatisfying. They dispensed with the multifunctional shell and divided the seat and back into separate, freely articulated elements connected by a spine (frame). Each element has a clearly defined function, which it fulfils optimally with a minimum amount of material. »Shock mounts« – rubber disks bonded onto the wooden surface – connect the seat and back with the frame, which exists in wood or metal and in two different heights, either as a dining chair or lounge chair. The original of the Eames DCW Chair was designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1945 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Herman Miller Furniture Company, Zeeland/Michigan/USA. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of natural plywood.
  • Vitra Alcove Plume Fauteuil Chair
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    Seat cushions can be individually detached and the fabric seat covers are removable. Chamber cushion overlay: filled with polyurethane foam rods and feathers. Structural frame: powder-coated steel, no external tubular frame. Back and side panels: integrated MDF panels for structural support; panel elements connected by zippers. Seat upholstery: several layers of PU foam with chamber cushion overlay. Back and arm cushions: filled with feathers and fibers. Neck cushion: filled with half down. Alcove Plume sofas and fauteuils include backrest cushions and small neck cushions as standard components. Dimensions: Overall Width - Side to Side: 33.75 Inches. Overall Depth - Front to Back: 33.75 Inches.
  • Vitra - Miniature Eames LCW Chair
    connox.com
    In 1940, Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen developed a chair with a novel plywood seat moulded into a three-dimensional form for a competition sponsored by the New York Museum of Modern Art. However, it was not possible to produce the chair commercially, due to inadequate technical methods. It was seldom possible to press the plywood into a three-dimensional form without it breaking or splitting. During the following years, Charles and Ray Eames concentrated their efforts on developing a new method. The plywood chairs DCW (Dining Chair Wood) and LCW (Lounge Chair Wood) are the result of this long-term experimentation. In 1945, Charles and Ray Eames returned to the idea of a seating shell made out of moulded plywood; however the results were unsatisfying. They dispensed with the multifunctional shell and divided the seat and back into separate, freely articulated elements connected by a spine (frame). Each element has a clearly defined function, which it fulfils optimally with a minimum amount of material. »Shock mounts« – rubber disks bonded onto the wooden surface – connect the seat and back with the frame, which exists in wood or metal and in two different heights, either as a dining chair or lounge chair. The original of the Eames LCW Chair was designed by Charles and Ray Eames in 1945 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Herman Miller Furniture Company, Zeeland/Michigan/USA. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of natural plywood.
  • Vitra Fauteuil Direction Chair
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    Fauteuil Direction is a well designed chair in which you can sit comfortably at the table. It pays homage to Prouvé''s typical philosophy of focusing on design factors. The chair is perfect for the home office where, particularly in combination with the small desk Compas Direction, it creates an individual touch and can also be used as a comfortable dining chair. In addition, Fauteuil Direction also looks great in elegant lobbies, restaurants or waiting areas. Features: Base: Round and molded sheet steel, powdercoated. Seat and backrest: Polyurethane foam. Designer: Jean Prouve. Dimensions: Overall Height - Top to Bottom: 32 Inches. Overall Width - Side to Side: 25.5 Inches. Overall Depth - Front to Back: 24.5 Inches.
  • Vitra - Miniature Wiggle Side Chair
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    As early as the 1960s, cardboard furniture emerged as a cheap and light alternative to traditional furniture. At that time, slotting and folding as well as supports were used to ensure that the cardboard could bear sufficient weight. Nevertheless, cardboard furniture hardly had a chance against plastic furniture, which was equally light. Frank O. Gehry discovered a process which enabled cardboard furniture to be made in massive blocks – cardboard sculptures, as it were. »One day I saw a stack of corrugated cardboard in my office; it was the material I used to build my architectural models. And I started playing around with it, gluing it together and then cutting it into shape with a handsaw and a pocket-knife«. Gehry called the material made of corrugated cardboard glued in layers that ran at right angles to each other »Edge Board«. In 1972 he brought out a series of extraordinarily stable cardboard furniture called »Easy Edges«. The original of the Wiggle Side Chair was designed by Frank O. Gehry in 1972 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra AG, Basel/Switzerland since 1992. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of polyurethane and leather.
  • Vitra Alcove Plume Fauteuil Chair with Armrest Cushion Set
    allmodern.com
    Chamber cushion overlay: filled with polyurethane foam rods and feathers. Seat cushions can be individually detached and the fabric seat covers are removable. Structural frame: powder-coated steel, no external tubular frame. Back and side panels: integrated MDF panels for structural support; panel elements connected by zippers. Seat upholstery: several layers of PU foam with chamber cushion overlay. Back and arm cushions: filled with feathers and fibers. Neck cushion: filled with half down. Alcove Plume sofas and fauteuils include backrest cushions and small neck cushions as standard components. Armrest cushions: filled with feathers and fibers. Dimensions: Overall Width - Side to Side: 33.75 Inches. Overall Depth - Front to Back: 33.75 Inches.
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  • Vitra - Miniature Big Easy Chair
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    In 1988 and 1989, Arad’s London »One Off« work shop created an entire series of »Big Easy« armchairs using bent sheet steel welded at the edges. The »Big Easys« were brought out as individual items or small limited series; they all had a striking basic form and inflated arms reminiscent of comics – but they differed in terms of the welding and color. In the course of time, the initially oarse, roughly welded »Big Easys« went through changes, first becoming colorful lacquered chairs with smooth surfaces and then elegant versions made of polished stainless steel. Although Ron Arad’s furniture are variants on everyday things, they seem strange and irritate the eye – not only owing to the choice of material. Formally and functionally speaking, they undermine customary assumptions. You feel you have to first learn how to use them. A »Big Easy’s« voluminous steel body of the »Big Easy« resembles a traditional upholstered club armchair but can hardly be associated with a sense of comfortable interiors. Ron Arad considered it an art object that could likewise be functional, but was not intended to be particularly practical. The original of the Big Easy Chair was designed by Ron Arad in 1988 and it is produced as 1:1 model by Vitra AG, Basel/Switzerland, since 1998. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of blackened stainless steel sheet metal.
  • Vitra Slow Arm Chair by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec
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    Choose from four different knitted fabric cover options. Seat and backrest cushion crafted of polyurethane foam and polyester wool. Metal base. Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec collection. Dimensions: Overall Height - Top to Bottom: 35 Inches. Overall Width - Side to Side: 37.5 Inches. Overall Depth - Front to Back: 36.5 Inches.
  • Vitra - Miniature Eames & Saarinen Organic Armchair
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    The »Organic Armchair« was a submission for the Museum of Modern Art‘s 1940 design competition for »Organic Design in Home Furnishings«. Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen, who that year worked together for the first time, won first prize with their »Organic Armchair«. One of the conditions for competition entries was that the object was suitable for industrial production. In 1941, the Eames developed a method for threedimensional molding of manufacture the award-winning chair. The 3-D seat, made possible by means of incisions made in the veneer and cutting pieces out of it, was covered in foam rubber and upholstered in fabric. As a result of the war-time economy and the initially high production costs, despite the original competition brief the prototypes did not go into series production. The original of the Eames & Saarinen Organic Armchair was designed by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen in 1940 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Vitra AG, Basel/Switzerland since 2004. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of formed plywood, birch wood and foam.
  • Vitra Hal Cantilever Side Chair
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    With Hal, Jasper Morrison has created a reinterpretation of the multifunctional shell chair and a varied chair range with a distinctly contemporary appearance. The shape of Hal's shell ensures plenty of freedom of movement and the slightly flexible plastic makes many different sitting positions possible even sideways and astride the chair. Because of this, Hal facilitates dynamic, ergonomic seating. Combining the chair with the matching Hal Table, which was developed at the same time, is also an option. Hal can be used in all kinds of environments in the office, as well as in public spaces and in the home. Features: Polypropylene seat. Base comes with glides for carpets or optional felt pads for hard floors. Cantilever tubular steel base. Base finish: Chrome. Hal collection. Dimensions: Overall Height - Top to Bottom: 31 Inches. Overall Width - Side to Side: 18.5 Inches. Overall Depth - Front to Back: 19.25 Inches.
  • Vitra - Miniature Saarinen Tulip Chair
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    The Tulip Chair is one of a series of chairs, stools, and tables developed by Eero Saarinen within a five-year period. The characteristic feature of the series is that the supporting structure has been pared to a central supporting stem »like a wineglass« in order to emphasise the uniformity of table and chair. Eero Saarinen describes the Tulip Chair: »The bases of tables and chairs in a typical furniture arrangement create an ugly, confusing, and restless world. I wanted to design a chair as an integrated whole once again. All important furniture of the past always had a holistic structure, from King Tut’s chair to that of Thomas Chippendale. Today, we are parting ways with this holism with our predilection for plastic and laminated wood shells. I am looking forward to the point when the plastics industry will be capable of manufacturing the chair using just one material, the way I have designed it.« The original of the Saarinen Tulip Chair was designed by Eero Saarinen in 1956 and it is produced as 1:1 model by the Knoll Associates Inc., New York/USA since 1956. The here offered miniature by Vitra (scale 1:6) consists of lacquered polyurethane, aluminium and fabrics.
  • Vitra Panton Dining Chair
    occa-home.co.uk
    An original design manufactured by Vitra, the Panton Chair has been through a number of production phases since its original launch. The last version of the chair authorised by Verner Panton was produced in collaboration with the designer at the end of the 1990s. This model realised one of Panton's fundamental objectives for the first time: a plastic chair as an inexpensive industrial product.
  • Vitra Charles & Ray Eames DAR Chair
    occa-home.co.uk
    Plastic Armchairs were first presented as part of a New York Museum of Modern Art competition. Low Cost Furniture Design. The organically shaped plastic seat shells were later combined with various different bases and manufactured in their millions. In their latest version made of polypropylene, the armchairs now offer even greater sitting comfort. Available in basic dark, red (poppy red), white, ocean, mauve grey, cream, stone white or mustard (
  • Vitra Charles & Ray Eames DSR Chair
    occa-home.co.uk
    This iconic mid century piece,with its bright colourful seat and Eiffel, metal leg is reproduced under license by Vitra. Originally designed by Charles & Ray Eames in 1950. A fantastic addition to any contemporary space for those with a discerning eye. Black and White normally in stock for delivery within 3-7 days and other colours made to order.
  • Vitra Panton Side Chair
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    Crafted of rigid expanded plastic. Painted surface and finished with a gloss lacquer. Dimensions: Overall Height - Top to Bottom: 35.25 Inches. Overall Width - Side to Side: 19.75 Inches. Overall Depth - Front to Back: 23.5 Inches.
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